The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview

Give my best respects to Mr. Davis, to Judge Williams,5 & beg them to
accept my thanks for their recent letters.6 I cannot tell you the esteem I have for them.

Yours truly,
S. P. CHASE.

Hon Green Adams
Frankfort Ky.

Adams had written at least twice since the end of July with news of politics and Military affairs in Kentucky. He also noted widespread negative feelings toward William Nelson and allegations of alcohol by Nelson. Adams to Chase, Aug. 24, 31, 1861 ( Chase Papers, Hist. Soc. Of Pa.).
Prov. 27:6.
Apparently a reference to reports confirming that Unionists had won overwhelming control of Kentucky's lower house. Daily National lntelligencer, Aug. 31, 1861.
Secretary of War Cameron had written on May 30 to express approval for Benjamin F. Butler's policy of accepting runaway slaves, or "contrabands," into Federal lines at Fortress Monroe. DAB, 3:358; OR, ser. 3, v. 1:243.
Rufus K. Williams, a jurist from western Kentucky and prominent Unionist politician. Nat. Cyc., 12:102-3.
Both men had written to protest Frémont's proclamation on the confiscation of slaves. Davis to Chase, Sept. 3, 1861 (above); Williams to Chase, Sept. 1, 1861 ( Chase Papers, L.C.).

FROM JOSEPH MEDILL

Autograph letter. Chase Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania (micro 17:0150).

Chicago Sept 15, 1861

Sec Chase
Dr Sir

The President's letter to Gen Fremont has cast a funeral gloom
over our patriotic city.1
We are stricken with a heavier calamity than
the battle of Bull run. It comes upon us like a killing June frost--which
destroys the comming harvest. It is a step backwards, and backward
steps seldom lead to good results. It will do much to revive secession
in Missouri and to embolden it in Kentucky. The penalty of rebel-
lion has been removed. The war hereafter will be merely assassination
on a large scale. The rebel murders the loyalist if he can, and in turn
may be shot, and that is the end of it. This is a slave-holders rebel-
lion. Slavery is at the bottom of the whole trouble. The revolt was in-
augurated to expand and strengthen the system, to give the oligarchy
more domain, more slaves and the unrestricted powers of Government
to defend and foster the institution / Hence, the slave-holders seek
the dismemberment or subjugation of the Republic. And until the Ad-
ministration sees the contest in its true light the blood of loyal men
will be shed in vain and the war will come to naught. The "instruc-
tions" to Butler were lame and equivocal enough, but this letter of
the President is frightfully retrograde. And nothing done by Buchanan
received so universal censure as it. If there were any-thing on which

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.