The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview
Philadelphia. A telegram just received indicates a good deal of uneasiness in New-York, created by the impression that the propositions referred to, will not meet the approval of Congress. How this may be, I am unable, of course, to say / A number of influential members have expressed to me their approval of them; and I beleive that, if they are cordially sustained by the sound financial men in the three great cities, they will encounter no very serious opposition.Please write me on this subject fully, and keep me advised, either personally or through Mr. Vail.4 I miss your counsels much, and should be very glad to see you.Permit me to congratulate you on the improved aspect of public affairs. Mr. Stanton's accession to the Department of War, will, I trust and beleive, give a new impetus to movements, and the needed guaranties of economy.5My daughter Nettie has been ill with scarlet fever at Philadelphia, and Katie has been there, also, in attendance upon her. Nettle is recovering, but Katie, I learn, has a severe cold and is almost sick.6 If possible, I mean to go to Philadelphia tomorrow.Please make my best regards acceptable to Mrs. Stevens and the young ladies.Yours most sincerely S P CHASE John A. Stevens, Esq., New-York
Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, on the Finances, 37th Cong., 1st sess., 1861, S. Ex. Doc. 2, 14.
Legislation enacted on July 17, 1861, authorized Chase to issue non-interest- bearing Treasury notes "payable on demand by the Assistants Treasurers of the United States at Philadelphia, New York, or Boston." Statutes at Large, 12:259.
The statement has six points altogether. Chase Papers, 1:327.
Henry F. Vail. In his response, Stevens encouraged passage of a large tax bill, the issuance of "exchequer bills" to pay contractors, and limited legalization for U.S. notes as legal tender. Stevens to Chase, Jan. 21, 1862 (Chase Papers, Hist. Soc. of Pa.).
The Senate had confirmed Edwin M. Stanton as secretary of war on January 15. DAB, 17:518.
Previous reports from Philadelphia inaccurately suggested that Kate Chase had scarlet fever. Henry D. Cooke to Chase, Jan. 17, 1862 (Chase Papers, Hist. Soc. of Pa.).

FROM EDWARD L. PIERCE

Autograph letter. Port Royal Correspondence, Records of Civil War Special Agencies of the Treasury Department (Record Group 366), National Archives (micro 19:0063).

This to be handed to Secretary Chase for his personal reading--the matter requiring his immediate personal attention--

Port Royal 19 Jan 1862.

Hon Salmon P Chase.

My Dear Sir.

I reached here on Friday last--having left N.Y. on Monday morning last and having been delayed there by Collector Barney who desired

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