Development and Local Knowledge: New Approaches to Issues in Natural Resources Management, Conservation, and Agriculture

By Alan Bicker; Paul Sillitoe et al. | Go to book overview
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malu acquire a renewed vitality and significance in this context and are directly important for arguments about compensation payments. At the same time, in a broader sense they enable the people to feel they understand, and to some extent can control, the activities of the companies. This indigenous knowledge is therefore a vehicle for popular agency in a changed contemporary context. The example therefore further demonstrates the need to take a broad definitional line in relation to knowledge, and to see that intellectual rights are bound up with deeply practical issues that link local cosmology with negotiations over monetary compensation payments. The restricted rights over malu stories that protected group claims before are turned into claims for payments from commercial enterprises that have entered the Duna area. In these senses the concepts of both indigenous knowledge and intellectual property rights have proved themselves to be highly relevant for understanding contemporary development processes.


References
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——1996. A Place Against Time. Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publications.
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——1998. Papua New Guinea a year after the drought. Environmental health issues in

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