The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview
judgment, the choice of a large majority of the Republicans of Ohio for the Senate last winter. Had the result depended on me that choice would have been carried into an election by the Legislature.As to recommendations for appointments under the Revenue Law5 in the Cuyahoga District my purpose is not fixed. My only objects in appointments are, (1st) to select competent men; and (2d) to deal fairly and [liberally toward] all who unite with us in general political organization and action. Whoever may be recommended, therefore, my action will be prompted neither by personal hostility against anybody, nor unduly, I trust, by personal attachment to anybody; but by a simple and sincere desire that all who support our common cause-- which far transcends in interest all personal claims--may feel that the appointing power which they have aided in establishing is not to be exercised without just regard to the claims and deservings of all.Very truly yours S P CHASE Hon. B. F. Wade
1. The version of this letter at micro 21:0967 is a copy, in Jacob Schuckers's handwriting, at the Cincinnati Historical Society. On July 26, Chase had written another letter to Wade, very similar to this one in substance. Chase's letterpress copy of that earlier letter is marked "Recalled." Chase to Wade, July 26, 1862 ( Chase Papers, Hist. Soc. of Pa.).
2. Wade had protested the pending appointment of former Cleveland mayor George B. Senter as a collector of internal revenue. "Without any cause whatever, he was my bitterest most unfair and unscrupulous antagonist at Columbus, last winter," complained Wade, "and I have no doubt his appointment would be regarded as an open insult to every friend I have in the State as well as to myself." Wade to Chase, July 22, 1862 ( Chase Papers, Hist. Soc. of Pa.).
3. The convention had taken place in Columbus on March 1, 1860. Chase to Parsons, Apr. 17, 1860 (above).
4. Chase had discussed his attitude toward Wade's reelection to the Senate in a letter to James Monroe, March 3, 1862 (above).
5. The internal revenue law of July 1, 1862. Statutes at Large, 12:432-89.

TO BENJAMIN F. BUTLER

Autograph letter. Benjamin F. Butler Papers, Library of Congress (micro 21:0993).

Please see that the letters of the President to Messrs. Johnson & Bullitt are delivered immediately.1

Washington July 31, 1862.

My dear General,

I have the pleasure of thanking you for your very friendly letter and of acknowledging your note requesting the appointment of young Mr. Nelson in the revenue Cutter service.

It would have given me pleasure to designate Mr. Nelson for examination, but he did not appear to be prepared for it without some further study. I contented myself therefore with expressions of good will, reserv

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