The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview
Montgomery County, a member of Ohio's lower house, 1862-65. Gilkey, Ohio Hundred Year Book, 266, 297; DAB, 8:14.
6. Conservative Whigs noted for their opposition to the radical policies of the "Conscience" Whigs. Daniel Walker Howe, The Political Culture of the American Whigs ( Chicago, 1979), 203.
7. Later in the year, Republican politician Columbus Delano came within two votes of being elected U.S. senator from Ohio. The supporters mentioned here were James Randolph Hubbell ( 1824-90), a resident of Delaware County, member of the Ohio House, 1849, 1858-59, 1862-63, and speaker, 1863, and apparently William H. West, a politician and state legislator from Bellefontaine. Bio. Dir. U.S. Cong., 892, 1224; Gilkey, Ohio Hundred Year Book, 215,217, 272.
8. George H. Howe and Samuel Quinby ( 1794- 1874) were from Trumbull County. William Peter Sprague ( 1827-99), Mills Gardner ( 1830- 1910), and Thomas H. Whetstone represented the state's fourteenth, fifth, and first senate districts. The Biographical Cyclopædia and Portrait Gallery with an Historical Sketch of the State of Ohio, 6 vols. ( Cincinnati, 1883-95), 7:990-91; Bio. Dir. U.S. Cong., 1043, 1856; Gilkey, Ohio Hundred Year Book, 173, 263, 272, 297, 307, 316.
9. Benjamin Eggleston ( 1816-88), state senator from Ohio's 1st district, 1862-65. Bio. Dir. U.S. Cong., 955; Gilkey, Ohio Hundred Year Book, 259.

TO HIRAM BARNEY?

Autograph note. Chase Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania (micro 18:0797).

Confidential1Some papers in New York are endeavoring continually to make me responsible for the Administration of the War Department.2This is mean. Mr. Lincoln frankly explained to Mr. Taussig of St Louis the true condition.3Every Head of Department is responsible for his department and only for his department. So far as any control is exercised over any departmental administration it is exercised by the President himself. Mr. Stanton is Secretary of War, General Halleck is Commanding General; Mr. Lincoln is Commander in Chief; and Mr. Lincoln Mr. Stanton & Gen Halleckexclusively conduct the war so far as I am concerned. That conduct is never made the subject of deliberation at the Meetings of the Heads of the Departments: and I am never consulted in regard to it; nor, with the experience I have had, when the case was somewhat otherwise some eighteen months ago, do I desire to be. In my department, I live by works--out of it, by faith.Why can't this be made to be properly understood? Can't you talk the matter over with Stanton,4 with Bryant, with Greely, &, without in any way, involving me or referring to what I have here written have the press properly set right?
1. Chase surely wrote this note to a confidant he could trust in New York City. Hiram Barney seems a likely candidate. Perhaps the note was never sent, or perhaps it was enclosed in some other letter. As for its date, Chase wrote in a similar vein to New York journalists early in September (see Chase to William Cullen Bryant, Sept. 4, 1862 [below]). In a letter to Horace Greeley on September 7, Chase noted of Lincoln's cabinet that "each one of us, to use a presidential expression runs his own machine, with almost no comparison of views or consultation of any kind." Chase had "no voice" in con

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