The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview

Of the millions required to pay the armory how many are [received] & keep out of circulation by the wives and families of soldiers, &c &c Mr. Stevens Bill as printed caused many anxious enquiries on Wall Street yesterday4 He does not seem to consider with the necessary care what he writes on this very delicate subject. I was asked again & again whether The Government intend to disregard their engagement with their creditors as to the payment of interest in Gold on the Bonds already issued. By the way The Eveng Post some time ago advised that the sect'y should not pay the Interest in Gold.--

The News of this evening that there is to be a battle in Tennessee & of an advance on The Rapahn is considered by me as The Begining of the end.5 Go grant it may be so.

I hope the President will not hesitate to issue The Proclan on the 1t Proximo / To loose such an opportunity to place himself foremost on the Roll of Fame would be,-- -- --

Truly your friend & sert JAMES A HAMILTON

To The Hon S. P. Chase &c &c Washington.

Chase had thanked Hamilton for sending an unidentified article from the Banker's Magazine. Chase to Hamilton, Nov. 27, 1862, in Hamilton, Reminiscences, 547.
"It is simply an impossibility," claimed the Post. "We regard it with favor," wrote the Tribune, "but do not place much reliance on it as a present resource." The Times considered Chase "entirely consistent" and "candid" in making the proposal. New York Evening Post, Dec. 8; New York Tribune, Dec. 10; New York Times, Dec. 6, 1862.
Hamilton evidently meant to write determining, but neglected to complete the word after hyphenation at the end of a line.
The "Loan and Currency Bill" proposed by Stevens included provisions "to suspend the payments of the Public Interest in Gold, and to tax the State Bank Circulation of the country." In January, Stevens continued to promote his own draft legislation as an alternative to a large finance bill favored by the majority of the Committee on Ways and Means. Chase to William P. Fessenden, Jan. 11, 1863 (below); New York Times, Dec. 10, 1862.
Hamilton referred to the Federal advance at Fredericksburg, Va. (on the Rappahannock River) and, apparently, to a reconnaissance toward Franklin, Tenn. Long, Civil War Day by Day, 295.

TO JOSEPH MEDILL

Letterpress copy of autograph letter. Chase Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania (micro 24:0207).

Wash Decr. 13, 1862

My dear Mr Medill

It is a strange thing for me to write in explanation or vindication of any recommendation of mine. I prefer to leave them to stand or fall by the judgments of those to whom they are presented.

-334-

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The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editorial Advisory Board v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chronology xi
  • Introduction by John Niven xv
  • Editorial Procedures xxiii
  • The Correspondence of Salmon P. Chase, 1858-March 1863 3
  • From Theodore Parker 4
  • To Gerrit Smith 7
  • From Joseph Medill 8
  • From Joseph Medill 11
  • To Abraham Lincoln 13
  • To Edward L. Pierce 14
  • To Charles Sumner 16
  • To James Monroe 18
  • To Joseph H. Barrett 20
  • To Thomas Spooner 22
  • To Richard C. Parsons 23
  • To Abraham Lincoln 27
  • From Edward I. Chase 28
  • To Robert Hosea 29
  • To Charles A. Dana 32
  • To John Greenleaf Whittier 33
  • To Ruhamah Ludlow Hunt 35
  • To George G. Fogg 37
  • To Benjamin F. Wade 40
  • To Winfield Scott 42
  • To George Opdyke 43
  • To Abraham Lincoln 46
  • To Norman B. Judd 48
  • To Abraham Lincoln 52
  • To William H. Seward 53
  • To Abraham Lincoln 54
  • From Richard Ela 55
  • From Henry W. Hoffman 56
  • To Hiram Barney 59
  • To Abraham Lincoln 60
  • To Samuel Hooper 61
  • To Alphonso Taft 62
  • To John J. Cisco 63
  • To William P. Mellen 65
  • To Jacob D. Cox 66
  • From Hiram Barney 67
  • To John Austin Stevens, Sr. 68
  • From Thomas M. Key 71
  • To George B. Mcclellan 73
  • From Jay Cooke 74
  • From Green Adams 76
  • To William P. Mellen 77
  • From William Nelson 79
  • From Green Adams 80
  • To John C. FrÉmont 83
  • To Charles P. Mcilvaine 89
  • To William Nelson 90
  • From Joshua F. Speed 91
  • From Garrett Davis 92
  • To Green Adams 94
  • From Joseph Medill 95
  • To William Tecumseh Sherman 97
  • To William Tecumseh Sherman 100
  • To Kate Chase 101
  • To James H. Walton 102
  • To Hiram Barney 103
  • To Abraham Lincoln 105
  • To Richard Smith 106
  • To Simon Cameron 107
  • To Cornelius S. Hamilton 110
  • From John J. Cisco 111
  • To John J. Cisco 112
  • From Edward L. Pierce 113
  • From William H. Reynolds 115
  • To John Austin Stevens, Sr. 118
  • From Edward L. Pierce 119
  • To Kate Chase 120
  • To Thaddeus Stevens 124
  • From William Sprague 129
  • From Mansfield French 132
  • To M. D. Potter 135
  • From Edward L. Pierce 136
  • To Hiram Barney 138
  • To James Monroe 141
  • From Edward L. Pierce 142
  • From Mansfield French 143
  • From Edward L. Pierce 146
  • To William P. Mellen 148
  • To Bradford R. Wood 151
  • From Edward L. Pierce 158
  • To Edwin M. Stanton 159
  • From William Nelson 166
  • To Jay Cooke 171
  • To Thomas M. Key 171
  • From Alexander Hays and James W. Hays 176
  • From Ormsby M. Mitchel 177
  • From Edward L. Pierce 178
  • To Jay Cooke 181
  • From Mary Peabody Mann 183
  • To Janet Chase 184
  • From Edward L. Pierce 185
  • To Janet Chase 188
  • From Edward L. Pierce 191
  • To Janet Chase 192
  • From Edward L. Pierce 197
  • To Edward L. Pierce 200
  • To David Hunter 202
  • To Murat Halstead 204
  • To Edwin M. Stanton 205
  • From Joseph Medill 206
  • To Irvin Mcdowell 207
  • To John Murray Forbes 209
  • To Edward L. Pierce 211
  • To Benjamin F. Butler 217
  • From George S. Denison 220
  • To William P. Fessenden 225
  • To Thaddeus Stevens 226
  • To Richard C. Parsons 228
  • To Edward Haight 229
  • To Benjamin F. Wade 233
  • To Benjamin F. Butler 234
  • To Edward L. Pierce 235
  • From William S. Rosecrans 239
  • To William Cullen Bryant 242
  • To Jay Cooke 246
  • From George Bancroft 249
  • From Robert Dale Owen 251
  • To William M. Dickson 254
  • From John Q. Smith 256
  • To William Cullen Bryant 258
  • To George S. Denison 261
  • From John Sherman 261
  • To John J. Cisco 265
  • To Horace Greeley 266
  • From John E. Williams 268
  • From Horatio G. Wright 270
  • To Alexander Sankey Latty 273
  • To Zachariah Chandler 275
  • To John Sherman 276
  • From Ormsby M. Mitchel 279
  • To Oran Follett 283
  • From William P. Mellen 284
  • From John Sherman 285
  • To John Jay 286
  • To William P. Mellen 287
  • To Ormsby M. Mitchel 288
  • To Napoleon Bonaparte Buford 289
  • From William Sprague 294
  • To Winfield Scott 297
  • To Jay Cooke 298
  • To Abraham Lincoln 299
  • From Hiram Barney 301
  • To William S. Rosecrans 302
  • To Hiram Barney 304
  • To Benjamin F. Butler 305
  • To Ezra Lincoln 307
  • To Richard C. Parsons 309
  • To George Opdyke 314
  • To Joseph H. Geiger 316
  • To Benjamin F. Butler 317
  • To Abraham Lincoln 318
  • From Benjamin F. Butler 320
  • From James A. Hamilton 331
  • To Joseph Medill 333
  • To Benjamin F. Butler 334
  • From George Opdyke 338
  • From Abraham Lincoln 340
  • To William H. Seward 341
  • To Thaddeus Stevens 342
  • From Simon Cameron 343
  • To Abraham Lincoln 344
  • To Abraham Lincoln 347
  • From Mansfield French 350
  • To William P. Fessenden 363
  • To Valentine B. Horton 366
  • To Elbridge G. Spaulding 368
  • To William P. Mellen 372
  • To Horace Greeley 374
  • From Horace Greeley 375
  • From John Sherman 379
  • To David Hunter 381
  • To Richard C. Parsons 382
  • To Galusha A. Grow 384
  • To Abraham Lincoln 385
  • To James A. Garfield 388
  • To Cuthbert Bullitt 389
  • To Abraham Lincoln 390
  • From George Opdyke 391
  • To George S. Denison 392
  • From George S. Denison 394
  • From Edward Bates 395
  • From George Opdyke 396
  • From Rufus Saxton 397
  • From Andrew Johnson 404
  • To William H. Aspin Wall and John Murray Forbes 407
  • To Robert J. Walker 408
  • From George S. Denison 412
  • From George S. Denison 414
  • Bibliography 421
  • Index 425
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