The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview
One thing I trust you will not fail to do. Get rid of all officers who are unwilling to recognize colored troops as fit to fight the battles of the Country, or manifest any disaffection towards yourself or the government on account of their employment; or indeed on any other accounts / We must have united hearts as well as joined hands for this struggle.There is nothing of moment new here. Which is fortunate for I am at the end of my sheet and it is late bedtime. With best regards to Mrs Lander,3 Gen. Saxton, Adml. Dupont when you see and other friends believe me dear GeneralYours most truly S P CHASE Maj. Gen. Hunter.
In a letter written February 8 from Port Royal, Hunter discussed plans to attack Charleston and told of black military enlistments in the Department of the South. "I have resolved, and so ordered," he wrote, "that all the able-bodied adults in the Department, not already employed, shall be drafted into the negro Brigade." On March 6 he issued the order for drafting African Americans into military service. In his letter, Hunter also indicated that he was writing to one of Chase's daughters (most likely Kate) to thank her for providing an introduction for Jean Margaret Davenport Lander. Hunter to Chase, Feb. 8, 1863 (Chase Papers, Hist. Soc. of Pa.); OR, ser. 1, v. 14:1020-21.
No Federal action against Charleston occurred until April 7, when ironclads under Samuel DuPont attacked Confederate positions in Charleston harbor but had to withdraw, unsuccessful, at dusk. Long, Civil War Day by Day, 335-36.
Renowned English-born actress Jean Margaret Davenport Lander ( 1829- 1903), whose husband, Union general Frederick West Lander, had died less than a year before. went to Port Royal to serve in the military hospital. Later she lived in Washington, D.C., and Lynn Mass. DAB, 10:570; New York Times, Aug. 4, 1903; Chase Papers, 1:483.

FROM JAMES A. GARFIELD

Autograph letter. Chase Papers, Library of Congress (micro 25:0374).

Murfreesboro, Tenn. Feb. 15th. 1863.

Hon. S. P. Chase--

My Dear Friend--

Your kind letter--enclosing one to Gen. Rosecrans, was forwarded from Cincinnati--and reached me two days ago. I have been here nearly three weeks but my horses did not arrive till three days ago. I have been the guest of Gen. Rosecrans since my arrival, and he has shown me all the kindness and consideration I could desire. He has a Division ready for me, but has expressed a wish that I stay with him and serve as chief of his staff. I am considerably embarrassed by the proposition and hardly know what to say about it--but I shall consult with him more fully and do whatever seems best for this army--without regard to my personal wishes or interests--I think I have seen the interior of Gen Rosecrans' nature as fully as I ever did that of any man I ever knew-- and am glad to tell you that I believe in him--that he is sound to the

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