The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3

By John Niven; James P. McClure et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project
"Not to us, Lord, not to us, but to your name, give glory."
Garfield had been elected to Congress in 1862 but did not resign his commission in the army until late 1863. DAB, 7:146.
At one point on his missionary tours, St. Paul faced strenuous opposition from residents of Ephesus--" beasts," in his terms. Bromily, Bible Enyclopedia, 2:117; 1 Cor. 15:32.

TO RICHARD C. PARSONS

Autograph letter. Chase Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania (micro 25:0377).

Washn. Feb. 16, 1863.

My dear Parsons,

Your affectionate and generous letters always give me the greatest pleasure: only I by no means think myself entitled to the expressions of gratitude which they contain. Whatever I have done to promote your interests has been fully merited by your services to our cause, setting aside altogether every consideration of your constant support to myself. If there were more such men to serve--I should be delighted.

I am sorry and mortified by Dangler's misconduct of which I had heard nothing until I received your letter or since except from your letter. I remember Stanton doubted him, and only appointed him on the strength of your recommendations and mine. Why couldn't he be honest.

Wade seems all right and I shall trust him fully. Whether disappointed or not I shall feel that I have taken the generous and patriotic part, and shall have nothing wherewith to reproach myself

I have been quite unwell again lately but am now nearly well--probably about as nearly well as I can ever expect to be. Five years down the declivity which steepens so much after fifty; and one can't expect to feel quite like a young man.

My present anxiety is chiefly concerning the banking bill. I am sorry that I ever had to bring it forward; but I fully believe in its absolute necessity as things now are; and I believe too that through the plan it proposes, rightly enunciated in law and rightly directed in administration, the best practicable currency for this currency can be obtained.

As to the War I know nothing except what everybody knows--I have no share in its administration, but, perforce, put my trust in the President, Stanton, and Halleck, resolved to do my part in my special sphere so that I shall have at least nothing with which greatly to reproach myself.

Write me often. Give my love to your wife & children, & best respects to Judge S-----1

Oh! I came near forgetting politics altogether. My idea is that all Republicans & all Democrats who love the country better than Slavery should unite; signify their Union by boldly assuming the name of Democratic Republicans; and fight political battles on principles

-384-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Salmon P. Chase Papers - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.