Women during the Civil War: An Encyclopedia

By Judith E. Harper | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

Women During the Civil War: An Encyclopedia is the first A to Z reference volume to offer a panoramic presentation of American women during the most turbulent era in U. S. history. Previous works have focused solely on the lives of women who contributed to or were affected by the war itself. This encyclopedia examines the experiences of women from all regions, races, classes, and leading ethnic groups (Irish, German, Norwegian, Jewish, Chinese) during the years 1861 to 1865, including those whose lives were relatively untouched by war. Drawing on a vast collection of sources from the nineteenth century to the present day, from Louisa May Alcott’s Hospital Days (1863) to Lauren Cook and DeAnne Blanton’s They Fought Like Demons: Women Soldiers in the American Civil War (2002), this book presents the wartime experiences of white women of the North and South, African-American women born free and in slavery, Native American women, Mexican-American women, frontier women of the West, and immigrant women.

The articles in this book may surprise readers, regardless of their level of familiarity with U. S. history. Persistent popular conceptions of the Civil War and of nineteenth-century American society do not recognize women as having been integral participants. Facts and folklore about men’s contributions to the Civil War—sensationalized and romanticized in movies, television, and literature—are well documented and loom large in the nation’s collective memory. The generals, soldiers, and battles are well known to most Americans. Yet, despite the contributions of tens of thousands of women, the general public is aware of the war work of only a handful—Clara Barton, Harriet Tubman, Mary Boykin Chesnut, Louisa May Alcott, or Julia Ward Howe. Although relatively little has been reported on the roles of women, many thousands of women nurses and hundreds of female soldiers risked their lives for the United States and the Confederate States of America. Tens of thousands of other women in the North and the South labored within soldiers’ aid societies to provide food, clothing, and comfort to the troops. Thousands of women in the North were outspoken about slavery and worked toward emancipation as abolitionists, orators, writers, and artists. In the South, women from all classes actively supported the Confederacy as novelists, writers, government workers, factory women, and agricultural workers.

The words of the women who endured the Civil War years were vital to the research of the essays in this book. Women’s diaries and correspondence, both published and unpublished, bring to light their daily activities, the issues that troubled and captivated them, the values that centered their lives, and the emotions that revealed their hearts. The examination of women’s Civil War era pamphlets, memoirs, newspaper accounts, essays, and fiction makes

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women during the Civil War: An Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • List of Entries xvii
  • A 1
  • B 29
  • Selected Readings 47
  • C 55
  • Selected Readings 70
  • Selected Readings 83
  • Selected Readings 91
  • D 97
  • Selected Readings 116
  • Selected Readings 121
  • E 125
  • F 143
  • Selected Readings 157
  • G 161
  • Selected Readings 164
  • Selected Readings 174
  • H 183
  • Selected Reading 196
  • I 205
  • J 223
  • Selected Readings 225
  • K 227
  • L 235
  • Selected Readings 247
  • Selected Readings 255
  • M 257
  • N 279
  • P 293
  • Selected Reading 300
  • R 311
  • S 325
  • T 367
  • U 385
  • V 393
  • W 401
  • Selected Readings 403
  • Selected Readings 416
  • Z 425
  • Glossary 429
  • Bibliography 433
  • Index 449
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 480

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.