Women during the Civil War: An Encyclopedia

By Judith E. Harper | Go to book overview

Selected Readings
Attie, Jeanie. Patriotic Toil: Northern Women and the American Civil War. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. 1998.
Giesberg, Judith Ann. Civil War Sisterhood: The United States Sanitary Commission and Women’s Politics in Transition . Boston: Northeastern University Press. 2000.

Woman’s National Loyal League

While the mass of women never philosophize on the principles that underlie national existence, there were those in our late war who understood the political significance of the struggle: the “irrepressible conflict” between freedom and slavery; between national and State rights…. Accustomed as most women had been to works of charity, to the relief of outward suffering, it was difficult to rouse their enthusiasm for an idea, to persuade them to labor for a principle…. This Woman’s Loyal League voiced the solemn lessons of the war: liberty to all; national protection for every citizen under our flag; universal suffrage, and universal amnesty.

—Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, History of Woman Suffrage, 1881 (Stanton et al. 2:2-3)

Early in 1863, two New York abolitionists and women’s rights activists, SUSAN B. ANTHONY and ELIZABETH CADY STANTON, initiated plans for a new political organization, to be composed entirely of women, that would execute the most extensive petition campaign ever attempted in the hope of persuading Congress to approve a Thirteenth Amendment guaranteeing the freedom of African Americans. During 1863 and 1864, the Woman’s National Loyal League (WNLL) introduced thousands of women to political activism while making a critical contribution to the abolitionist movement’s quest for the “immediate emancipation” of the slaves.

Since petitioning the government was the only political means open to mid-nineteenth-century women, Anthony and Cady Stanton vowed that the WNLL would exploit it to the fullest. Anthony’s petition drive to expand the Married Women’s Property Law in New York State in the mid- to late 1850s was so successful that she and Cady Stanton felt confident in setting the WNLL’s goal at a million signatures. Throughout every Northern state, from Maine to California, women distributed petitions in their communities. They sent the signatures of men and women on reams of parchment to the WNLL’s office in New York City. Anthony and Cady Stanton then delivered the petitions to Massachusetts Republican Senator Charles Sumner, the congressional leader of the drive for the Thirteenth Amendment, who then exhibited them before both houses of Congress.

In April 1864, in response to the 250,000 signatures on WNLL petitions and a groundswell of popular support, the Senate passed the Thirteenth Amendment. Because the House of Representatives delayed its action, Anthony kept the pressure on WNLL members to circulate petitions all through the summer of 1864. By August, with 400,000 signatures

-416-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women during the Civil War: An Encyclopedia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • List of Entries xvii
  • A 1
  • B 29
  • Selected Readings 47
  • C 55
  • Selected Readings 70
  • Selected Readings 83
  • Selected Readings 91
  • D 97
  • Selected Readings 116
  • Selected Readings 121
  • E 125
  • F 143
  • Selected Readings 157
  • G 161
  • Selected Readings 164
  • Selected Readings 174
  • H 183
  • Selected Reading 196
  • I 205
  • J 223
  • Selected Readings 225
  • K 227
  • L 235
  • Selected Readings 247
  • Selected Readings 255
  • M 257
  • N 279
  • P 293
  • Selected Reading 300
  • R 311
  • S 325
  • T 367
  • U 385
  • V 393
  • W 401
  • Selected Readings 403
  • Selected Readings 416
  • Z 425
  • Glossary 429
  • Bibliography 433
  • Index 449
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 480

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.