Secret Intelligence in the Twentieth Century

By Heike Bungert; Jan G. Heitmann et al. | Go to book overview

12

The KGB and Germany: Some Thoughts by a Participant in the Events

Sergei A. Kondrachev

Before entering into the main subject of this chapter, I wish to say that we, the veterans of the Soviet and Russian secret services, more than anybody else feel the whole depth of the tragedy the peoples of our country have lived through before the war and in the first post-war years. I say before the war, but if we go into the history of our country, we also register a wide use of punitive practices by secret services in the Russian Empire as far back as Ivan the Terrible. However, historical precedent cannot serve as justification for later abuses and there is no limit to our condemnation of punitive practices where security services were involved by decision of supreme authority. In all, nearly 24,000 officers and functionaries of special services were the victims of their own government, most of them losing their lives.

The situation in the Soviet Union before the war caused many foreign and especially German diplomats and intelligence officers to misjudge developments and conclude that the Soviet Union could not withstand an attack of the German army and would collapse within a few weeks. In the Russian archives are copies of the reports written by able German diplomats such as the minister counsellor of the German Embassy in Moscow, Gustav Hilger, who drew the attention of the German general staff to the weakness of Soviet agriculture and industry. This was certainly true in substance, but not concerning the possible consequences. The war efforts displayed by my compatriots demonstrated the ability of the people to mobilize their inborn forces

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Secret Intelligence in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 200

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.