Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing

By James Waller | Go to book overview

“Nits Make Lice”

AFTER COLUMBUS “DISCOVERED” the Americas in 1492, he returned the following year to install himself as “viceroy and governor of [the Caribbean islands] and the mainland” of America. From the large island he called “Española” (the modern island of Haiti), Columbus quickly instituted policies of slavery and systematic extermination against the indigenous Taino population. Sources from that time are replete with accounts of Spanish colonists hanging Tainos en masse, roasting them on spits, burning them at the stake, and hacking their children into pieces to be used as dog food. In a mere three years, the Tainos were reduced from as many as 8 million to about 3 million people. Only 100,000 Tainos were left by the time Columbus departed in 1500. By 1520, the number had fallen to just 20,000. Four decades later, only 200 indigenous people were recorded in the Spanish census of Española. 1

Genocide in the Americas, however, was only just beginning. In 1492, it is estimated that well over 100 million indigenous people inhabited the Western hemisphere. Two centuries later, it is estimated that the indigenous population of the Americas had been diminished by some 90 percent and was continuing to fall steadily. While scholars still debate the exact scale of the population decline, the catastrophic demographic impact of the European exploration and settlement of the New World on the indigenous peoples is undeniable. In the words of Ward Churchill, professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder, “The genocide inflicted upon American Indians over the past five centuries is unparalleled in human history, both in terms of its sheer magnitude and in its duration.” 2

Beginning in 1830, the U.S. government undertook a policy of “removing” all indigenous people from the area east of the Mississippi River. In the series of internments and forced marches that followed, entire peoples were decimated. By 1840, with the exception of a handful of tiny Iroquois reser

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 316

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.