Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing

By James Waller | Go to book overview

NOTE

Preface
1
The account of Sadri and Mihrie Sikaqi comes from a special section titled “Crisis in Kosovo” in the June 16, 1999, edition of the Washington Post, p. A28.
2
Cited in Lance Morrow, “Evil,” Time (June 10, 1991), p. 52.
3
See A. Westing, “War as a Human Endeavour,” Journal of Peace Research 3 (1982). The data on war-related deaths is drawn from William Eckhardt's “War-Related Deaths since 3000 b.c.,” Bulletin of Peace Proposals (December 1991).
4
Michael P. Ghiglieri, The Dark Side of Man: Tracing the Origins of Male Violence (Reading, Mass.: Perseus, 1999), p. 162.
5
Associated Press, “Third of Nations Mired in Conflict,” December 30, 1999.
6
The distinction between terrorism “from below” and state-directed terrorism comes from the groundbreaking work in this area by Walter Laqueur. See particularly his Terrorism (Boston: Little, Brown, 1977).
7
The estimate of 60 million victims of mass killing and genocide comes from Smith's “Human Destructiveness and Politics” in Isidor Wallimann and Michael N. Dobkowski, eds., Genocide and the Modern Age: Etiology and Case Studies of Mass Death (Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 2000), p. 21.
8
James Waller, Face to Face: The Changing State of Racism across America (New York: Perseus, 1998); Prejudice across America (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2000).

-281-

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Becoming Evil: How Ordinary People Commit Genocide and Mass Killing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface - I Couldn't Do This to Someone ix
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Contents xix
  • I - What Are the Origins of Extraordinary Human Evil? 1
  • Introduction: A Place Called Mauthausen 3
  • 1 - The Nature of Extraordinary Human Evil 9
  • Nits Make Lice 23
  • 2 - Groups, Ideology, and Extraordinary Evil 29
  • Dovey's Story 50
  • 3 - Psychopathology, Personality, and Extraordinary Evil 55
  • The Massacre at Babi Yar 88
  • 4 - The Dead End of Demonization 94
  • The Invasion of Dili 124
  • II - Beyond Demonization: How Ordinary People Commit Extraordinary Evil 131
  • A Model of Extraordinary Human Evil 133
  • 5 - Our Ancestral Shadow 136
  • The Tonle Sap Massacre 169
  • 6 - Identities of the Perpetrators 175
  • Death of a Guatemalan Village 197
  • 7 - A Culture of Cruelty 202
  • The Church of Ntamara 230
  • 8 - Social Death of the Victims 236
  • The “safe Area” of Srebrenica 258
  • III - What Have We Learned and Why Does It Matter? 265
  • 9 - Can We Be Delivered from Extraordinary Evil? 267
  • Note 281
  • Selected Bibliography 303
  • Index 311
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