Emotion, Social Relationships, and Health

By Carol D. Ryff; Burton H. Singer | Go to book overview

2
Meta-Emotion,
Children's Emotional Intelligence, and
Buffering Children from Marital Conflict
John Gottman

For the past 13 years, my laboratory has been investigating the transfer of marital discord to the developing child. We have been searching for buffers against the deleterious effects of marital conflict on children. The question that motivated this research was: is there anything that parents can do if they are in an ailing marriage to buffer their children? Our longitudinal research suggests one potential answer to this question (Gottman, Katz, & Hooven, 1995).

The cornerstone of our research was a concept called meta-emotion. Just as the term Meta-communication refers to communication about communication, and the term Meta-cognition refers to how we think about our thinking, in a similar way, the term Meta-emotion refers to our emotions about our emotions. We had a much broader meaning in mind than just feelings about feelings. We were also interested in what can be called the “executive functions” of emotion, those things that regulate our emotional experience and expression.

We were interested in how people feel about an emotion like anger, what the history of their experience with anger has been (in their primary families and so on), what were their metaphors, associated concepts, and narratives about anger, and what their philosophy about emotion was. We interviewed people about their history, feelings and metaphors, narratives, philosophy about sadness, anger, and more recently, fear, pride, love, guilt, and embarrassment. We found that huge variation exists in people's meta-emotions. For example, some people said anger is from the devil, that they punished their children just for getting angry even if there were no misbehavior. Others viewed anger like clearing one's throat—a natural event. They said that one simply expresses one's anger and then goes on.

In brief, we discovered two basic types of parents: emotion dismissing and emotion coaching. Here are some of the characteristics of emotion-dismissing (ED) parents.

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Emotion, Social Relationships, and Health
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Contributors vii
  • Emotion, Social Relationships, and Health *
  • 1 - Integrating Emotion into the Study of Social Relationships and Health 3
  • References *
  • 2 - Meta-Emotion, Children's Emotional Intelligence, and Buffering Children from Marital Conflict 23
  • References 39
  • Commentary *
  • Note *
  • References *
  • 3 - Relationship Experiences and Emotional Well-Being 57
  • Notes *
  • References 83
  • Commentary *
  • References *
  • 4 - Relationships Among Social Support, Emotional Expression, and Survival 97
  • References *
  • Commentary *
  • References *
  • 5 - Mapping Emotion with Significant Others onto Health 133
  • Note *
  • References *
  • Commentary *
  • References 187
  • 6 - Social Relationships and Health 189
  • Note *
  • References *
  • Commentary *
  • References *
  • 7 - Social Relationships and Susceptibility to the Common Cold 221
  • Note *
  • References *
  • Commentary *
  • Note *
  • References 242
  • 8 - Social Context and Other Psychological Influences on the Development of Immunity 243
  • References *
  • Commentary 262
  • References *
  • Author Index 273
  • Subject Index 283
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 289

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.