Public Information Provision in the Digital Age: Implementation and Effects of the U.S. Freedom of Information Act

By Maarten Botterman; Tora Bikson et al. | Go to book overview

ANNEX 2 WOB LEGAL TEXT (TRANSLATED FROM DUTCH)
Act of 31 October 1991, containing regulations governing public access to government informationWe Beatrix, by the grace of God, Queen of the Netherlands, Princess of Orange-Nassau, etc., etc., etc.Greetings to all who shall see or hear these presents! Be it known:Whereas We have considered that, in view of Article 110 of the Constitution, it has proved desirable, in the interests of effective, democratic governance, to amend the rules concerning openness and public access to government information and to incorporate these rules in statute law wherever possible;We, therefore, having heard the Council of State, and in consultation with the States General, have approved and decreed as We hereby approve and decree:
Chapter I. Definitions

Section 1
The definitions employed in this Act and the provisions deriving from it shall be as follows:
a. document: a written document or other material containing data which is deposited with an administrative authority;
b. administrative matter: a matter of relevance to the policies of an administrative authority, including the preparation and implementation of such policies;
c. internal consultation: consultation concerning an administrative matter within an administrative authority or within a group of administrative authorities in the framework of their joint responsibility for an administrative matter;
d. independent advisory committee: a committee appointed by the government to advise one or more administrative authorities, the members of which do not include any civil servants who advise the administrative authority to which they are responsible on the subjects put before the committee. A civil servant who is the secretary or an advisory member of such a committee shall not be regarded as a member for the purposes of this provision;
e. civil service or mixed advisory committee: a committee responsible for advising one or more administrative authorities, which is composed partly or wholly of civil servants whose duties include advising the administrative authority to which they are responsible on the subjects put before the committee.
f. personal opinion on policy: an opinion, proposal, recommendation or conclusion of one or more persons concerning an administrative matter and the arguments they advance in support thereof;
g. environmental information: all information available in written, visual, audible or digital form concerning the condition of water, air, soil, fauna, flora, agricultural land and nature reserves; concerning activities, including activities causing nuisance such as noise, and measures which have or probably will have an adverse affect on these; and concerning relevant protective activities and measures, including measures under administrative law and environmental protection programmes.

Section 1a
1. This Act shall apply to the following administrative authorities:
a. Our Ministers;
b. the administrative authorities of provinces, municipalities, water boards and regulatory industrial organisations;
c. administrative authorities whose activities are subject to the responsibility of the authorities referred to in subsection 1 (a and b);
d. such other administrative authorities as are not excluded by order in council.
2. Notwithstanding subsection 1 (d), this Act shall apply only to such administrative authorities

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Public Information Provision in the Digital Age: Implementation and Effects of the U.S. Freedom of Information Act
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction 7
  • 1 - Understanding Foia 9
  • 2 - Comparison Us Vs Dutch Situation 23
  • 3 - Implementation and Impact of Foia 31
  • 4 - Concluding Remarks 47
  • Annexes 52
  • Annex 1: Foia Legal Text 54
  • Annex 2 Wob Legal Text (translated from Dutch) 64
  • Annex 3: Comparative Tables Between Foia and the Wob 69
  • Annex 4 Organisation of Interviews 74
  • Annex 5 – Literature and Web Site References 76
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