White Violence and Black Response: From Reconstruction to Montgomery

By Herbert Shapiro | Go to book overview

PART I
The Post-Emancipation Decades

The sooner a civilization perishes which is founded on cheating and murder the
better. Better that the waters of the great river should again cover the land, which
in ages it has formed, than that it should be occupied by a State which breeds her
youth to fraud and assassination.

Report of United States Senate Special Committee
investigating 1883 Mississippi racial violence

We plead not for the colored people alone, but for all victims of the terrible
injustice which puts men and women to death without form of law.

Ida B. Wells-Barnett, "Southern Horrors".

John Hunter's folks told me that. They told me I was bragging and boasting that
I would have the land, and the Ku-Klux were going to whip me for that.

Testimony of Lucy McMillan at hearing of U. S. Congress,
Joint Select Committee to Inquire into the Condition of
Affairs in the Late Insurrectionary States.

-3-

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