White Violence and Black Response: From Reconstruction to Montgomery

By Herbert Shapiro | Go to book overview

FOUR
The Violence of the Progressive Era

THE TWENTIETH century was heralded as the dawn of a new enlightened age of reason and peace. But in actuality mankind during the new century was to witness both revolutionary change and violence unleashed on an unprecedented scale. In the years since 1900 Afro-Americans, operating in a changed world context and expressing their demands through a more effective, organized militancy, have made progress in their struggle for freedom. But these years have also seen racial violence intensified, modernized in its methods, and extended throughout the nation.

The violence inflicted upon blacks during the early years of the twentieth century foreshadowed the genocidal treatment of racial and ethnic minorities that would become one of the hallmarks of this era. Violence against individuals or groups of individuals would become transformed into a systematic assault upon the lives and physical well-being of the entire minority group, in its most extreme form developing into an attempt to exterminate entire peoples. In the United States after 1900, lynchings continued as weekly phenomena, and mob assaults, comparable to European pogroms, against black communities became commonplace occurrences in both the North and the South. W. E. B. Du Bois was indeed prescient when he wrote that "the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line." What to some appeared to be only an issue of parochial American significance Du Bois recognized as having critical meaning for the world.

An introduction to the racial brutality of the present century was provided by the 1900 "riot" occurring in the city of New York. This event was a confrontation between the black population of the nation's greatest and most cosmopolitan city on one side and the official representatives of law and order on the other. New York streets were the setting for acts of terror against blacks, and in the aftermath of mob violence the point was driven home that public authority would not discipline those responsible.

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
White Violence and Black Response: From Reconstruction to Montgomery
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 565

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.