Adolescent Romantic Relations and Sexual Behavior: Theory, Research, and Practical Implications

By Paul Florsheim | Go to book overview

Introduction
Paul Florsheim

At some point in our adult lives, most of us will feel compelled to say something useful to a young man or woman struggling with a romantic relationship. Perhaps this hypothetical youth falls for someone who looks (to us) like nothing but trouble, or things seem to be going too far too fast, or he or she is distraught following a bad fight or breakup. In these situations, it is difficult to know what to say. We are at a loss for words partly because we were once young and we know that in the realm of romance, wisdom and experience mean little to new initiates. Most of us made bad decisions in choosing romantic partners, and made mistakes about how we treated past loves. Yet, we know that we needed to live through and learn from these experiences and would have been unlikely to listen to advice offered by our elders.

We are also at a loss for words because we have only our own experiences to guide us. Although we have some ideas about what sorts of relationships are bad for adolescents, we recognize that the process of distinguishing between “healthy, normal, adaptive” and “unhealthy, abnormal, maladaptive” relationships is fraught with difficulties. Definitions of normal relations vary widely, depending on contextual norms, social constraints, cultural values, and developmental phases. Moreover, adolescents in relationships that appear healthy may experience a great deal of psychological distress when problems arise. Adolescents in relationships that seem troubling to us might feel happier than ever. These ironic twists make it difficult to offer useful guidance. How can we make sense of this?

While we know that there are no simple solutions to the difficulties posed by love and sex, it is nonetheless our responsibility to help youth in our care to sort though the issues and reflect upon their feelings. We need to provide a developmental context that helps adolescents make thoughtful, heartfelt decisions about love and sex. We need to help them acquire the tools they will need to build and maintain healthy relationships. First we need to identify those tools for ourselves.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Adolescent Romantic Relations and Sexual Behavior: Theory, Research, and Practical Implications
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 414

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.