Diversity in Advertising: Broadening the Scope of Research Directions

By Jerome D. Williams; Wei-Na Lee et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
On the Predictive Utility of the
Implicit Association Test: Current
Research and Future Directions
Michael J. Sargent
Bates College

Agreat deal of research in marketing and socialpsychology has investigated the effectiveness of persuasive appeals when the source of the appealis a member of astigmatized group. For example, do White message recipients respond more favorably to White spokespersons, Black spokespersons, ordoes it not matter? When might it matter moreorless?

One approach common to several studies of this issue has been to examine the impact of Whites'racialprejudice on the ir evaluations of advertisements featuring Black or White individuals. The results of the se investigations have been mixed. Cagley and Cardozo (1970), for example, exposed White participants to three print ads: one featuring only Black models, one featuring only White models, and one with a racially heterogeneous cast. Cagley and Cardozoalso measured participants' racialprejudice by usingaself-report measure. The Yfound that low-prejudice individuals responded similarly to all three ads, but high-prejudice individuals responded more favorably to the all-White ad than to either of the others. In contrast, Bush, Hair, and Solomon (1979) found little evidence that high-prejudice Whites evaluated advertisements more favorably if the yfeatured White models than if the yfeatured Blacks. Similarly, Whittler (1989) found little evidence that high-prejudice Whites discriminatedin the ir evaluation of ads featuring Black and White actors. Although on one product, high-prejudice Whites reported greater difficulty identifying with the Black actor, the ir product evaluations and evaluations of the advertisement by the actor's race. Consistent with this result, Whittler and Di Meo (1991) found that high-prejudice Whites evaluated a product equally favorably, regardless of whether a Black or White spokesperson

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diversity in Advertising: Broadening the Scope of Research Directions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 447

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.