Diversity in Advertising: Broadening the Scope of Research Directions

By Jerome D. Williams; Wei-Na Lee et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
Diversityin Advertising:
The Influence of Contextual
Conditioning Effects on Attitudes
Johan de Heer
Telematica Instituut
Sjaak (J.) G. Bloem
Janssen-Cilag b. v., Unit Business Intelligence
Sofie E. W. M. Paijmans
Valkenbosch Consultancy

Over Products, brands, consumer segments and time, advertising messages are by a highdegree of variability. Whatever the ads' nature, spatiallayout, visual aesthetics, goal, content, target group or medium, the combination of all the se aspects provides for avirtually unlimited number of unique and distinct messages. Given ad diversity, This chapter examines whether contextualinformation influences the attitudes toward the ads. We distinguishbetween twotypes of ads: profit adsand nonprofit ads. We also distinguishbetween twotypes of contextualinformation: cognitive laden and affective laden (Yi, 1990a, 1990b). Cognitive laden referstothe “content” of the contextualinformation (what is it about). Affective laden referstotheaffective or emotionalfeelings from the contextualinformation (what kind of feeling does it generate). However, we limitour focus to the effect of affective laden contextualinformation on the attitudetoward profit and nonprofit ads. Most studies that have examined The effects of affective contextualinformation on attitudetoward the ad (Aylesworth &Mac Kenzie, 1998; Kamins, Marks, & Skinner, 1991; Kirmani &Yi, 1991; Lord, Lee, & Sauer, 1994; Stayman, 1994; Yi, 1990a, 1990b)are limitedin external validity, because only one advertisement was used as stimulus material. Inother words, findings in one study

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