Reshaping Technical Communication: New Directions and Challenges for the 21st Century

By Barbara Mirel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER
7
KAREN SCHRIVER
KSA Document Design & Research

Taking Our Stakeholders Seriously:
Re-Imagining the Dissemination
of Research in Information Design

It is an exciting time for research in information design. Researchers are now in the rather luxurious position of being able to draw on nearly a century of findings about rhetoric, writing, visual design, psychology, culture, and human communication. Not only are researchers expanding on past work, but they are also developing hybrid lines of inquiry that cross disciplinary borders and break methodological stereotypes. The last few decades have been marked by growth not only in the number of studies1 carried out, but also in the forums for sharing this work, for example, journals, electronic mailing lists, and conferences.2 On the surface, research in information design appears healthy and vigorous.

Scratch the surface, however, and it becomes evident that not everyone would characterize the state of information design research as healthy, especially if positive feedback from the field's many stakeholders is an index of vitality. E-mail posts made to Web-based electronic mailing lists in the field (e.g., TECHWR-L and InfoDesign-Café) suggest that practitioners of information design are negative to lukewarm in their feelings about research in the field. Practicing information designers argue that research is out of touch with the everyday problems of

____________________
1
For example, a survey of dissertations between 1989 and 1998 yielded some 200 studies that contribute to knowledge about professional and technical communication (Rainey, 1999).
2
For a discussion of the development of journals and conferences in the field, see Schriver (1997, chapter 2).

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reshaping Technical Communication: New Directions and Challenges for the 21st Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 216

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.