Reshaping Technical Communication: New Directions and Challenges for the 21st Century

By Barbara Mirel | Go to book overview
Save to active project

APPENDIX B2

A press release based on the research on drug education literature described in Appendix B1. The audience is the general public who may read newspaper articles.

NEWS FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Karen Schriver, Ph. D. 412 828–8791

“Just Say No To Drugs” and Other Unwelcome Advice:
Teens Speak Back!

“These people must think we are really stupid.
—A 7th grader from Pittsburgh

PITTSBURGH, PAFeb. 27, 1997—Research on public information about drug prevention finds that brochures designed to encourage teens to “Just Say No to Drugs” may evoke scorn and ridicule. A study by Dr. Karen A. Schriver in Dynamics in Document Design (Wiley, 1997) explores how teenagers react to the words and pictures of anti-drug brochures. Teenagers in the study found that drug prevention materials were often “condescending” and “corny. For example, one brochure produced by Health and Human Services during the Reagan-Bush era recommended turning down offers of drugs by saying, “No thanks, I'd rather walk my pet python. Teenagers tended to characterize the writers of the brochures as “seriously out of touch. One 8th grader offered this impression: “The writer sounds like somebody who would never come to my neighborhood, but who wants to control us. Said another, “It seems like it was written by someone who sits in an office all day and gets all their information from books. This research suggests that taxpayer dollars are sometimes wasted on drug prevention messages that backfire with teenagers—showing the crucial role of testing what works and what doesn't.

more

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reshaping Technical Communication: New Directions and Challenges for the 21st Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 216

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?