Reshaping Technical Communication: New Directions and Challenges for the 21st Century

By Barbara Mirel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER
8

Migrations: Strategic Thinking
About the Future(s)
of Technical Communication
BRENTON FABER
JOHNDAN JOHNSON-ELLOLA
Clarkson University

Clarkson University seems to be an appropriate place for the series of discussions we have had that led to the creation of this chapter. Located in St. Lawrence County in upstate New York, we are about a 45-minute drive to the Canadian border, about 90 minutes from Canada's capital city, Ottawa, and nearly the same distance from the metropolitan center of Montreal. An hour south are Lake Placid and Adirondack National Park, which still holds the lodges of some of America's wealthiest families. The park has recently enjoyed a renaissance of tourism, hosting numerous business conferences, two international triathlons, a marathon, numerous hockey tournaments, and figure skating competitions. Last spring, bird watchers from across the world came to the park to see the three-toed woodpecker, a rare species in North America.

Clarkson's faculty is comprised of researchers from nearly every continent on the globe, and the school is a world leader in numerous scientific and engineering fields. Like most universities, we enjoy the latest technological innovations. Our students come from all over the world, and many bring with them even more expensive automobiles than those located in the business school parking lot. The local college town, Potsdam, New York, boasts Mexican, Indian, Chinese, and Italian restaurants, and until her recent move to Switzerland, Canadian country music star Shania Twain was occasionally sighted at the local grocery store.

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reshaping Technical Communication: New Directions and Challenges for the 21st Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 216

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.