Reshaping Technical Communication: New Directions and Challenges for the 21st Century

By Barbara Mirel | Go to book overview

Appendix:
Proposed Research Agenda
for Technical Communication
In June 2000, 18 technical communication specialists met at the Milwaukee Symposium to discuss new strategies and directions for moving the profession forward. Composed of about 60% university and 40% industry professionals, the group identified joint efforts between the two worlds that, from their perspective, are crucial for enhancing the field's status and value.One of these efforts—represented here—is a new line of research that the specialists deem critical for advancing our knowledge and for expanding and strengthening our field's contributions. Through lengthy brainstorming and categorizing that involved stimulating and often heated discussions, the Symposium participants developed a research agenda that involves scholarly as well as practical investigations, and academic designs as well as analyses and testing carried out in workplace projects. We present this agenda here as a starting point for continued discussion, debate, negotiation, and invention.These proposed areas for future study embody and reflect the perspectives and priorities of the people who composed them. Therefore, we now list and later briefly describe the participants and the points of view that they brought to bear in the discussions. The participants included:
Stephen Bernhardt, University of Delaware
Russell Borland, retired from Microsoft
Deborah Bosley, University of North Carolina-Charlotte

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