Academic Dishonesty: An Educator's Guide

By Bernard E. Whitley Jr.; Patricia Keith-Spiegel | Go to book overview

3
Fostering Academic Integrity
in the Classroom

In this part, we present a number of suggestions for fostering academic integrity and preventing, detecting, and dealing with academic dishonesty at the classroom level. We have gleaned these suggestions from a variety of sources in the scholarly literature and institutional policies and publications, making it impossible to cite every author who has discussed a specific technique. An example would be the suggestion to increase the space between students as a way to prevent students from copying on exams. Many of these suggestions have appeared so often and in so many forms that it seems reasonable to consider them as being in the public domain. Instead of trying to cite every mention of a technique, we have chosen to cite selectively, and we apologize to any author whom we do not cite who has written about a particular technique.

This chapter emphasizes the positive side of the issue by discussing ways in which instructors can foster academic integrity in their classrooms. Chapters 4 and 5 deal with the negative and more anxiety-producing aspects of handling academic dishonesty, such as preventing and detecting academic dishonesty and confronting suspected cheaters.


ESTABLlSHlNG A SUPPORTIVE
CLASSROOM CLIMATE

Classroom climate is a term that refers to the social-psychological context of student-teacher interactions usually defined in terms of the students' perceptions of the teacher (e.g., Rosenfeld, 1983). A classroom climate can be either positive, fostering the academic goals of the course by being warm, supportive, and instructing, or it can be negative, hindering attainment of those goals by being cold, uncaring, and punishing. A negative climate

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