Academic Dishonesty: An Educator's Guide

By Bernard E. Whitley Jr.; Patricia Keith-Spiegel | Go to book overview

Subject Index

A
Academic dishonesty
costs of ignoring, 13
cross-cultural issues, 20–22, 144, 145
history of, 3
model of, 32–34
norms concerning, 4, 18, 31, 101, 105, 106, 139, 141
and other forms of deviance, 29, 57
prevalence, 6–7, 9
reasons for concern, 4–6
repeat offending, 7, 120, 123, 136
and student performance, 35
see also Behaviors considered dishonest; Cheating; Dishonesty; Factors influencing academic dishonesty; Institutional policy; Integrity ethos; Integrity program; Plagiarism
Academic honesty, 25–26
see also Institutional policy; Integrity ethos; Integrity program
Adjudication procedures, 13, 117–123, 131–133
formal, 122–123, 124, 125, 132–134
informal, 118–122, 132, 133, 136 recommendations for, 120–122
legal issues, 100, 120, 132–133, 134–135
records, 136
student role, 132, 134
Administrators, 4, 130, 135, 138, 150, 152–153
responsibilities, 131
support for faculty, 5, 15, 142, 143
American College Personnel Association, 153, 155

B
Behaviors considered dishonest, 8, 16–20, 130
faculty member's beliefs, 18–19
student vs faculty beliefs, 19–20, 27, 37–40
students' beliefs, 18
typology of, 17

C
Catalogs, 56, 138
Center for Academic Integrity, 129, 152, 153, 154
Cheating, 17
see also Academic dishonesty; Behaviors considered dishonest; Examinations
Classroom climate, 43–55, 108
Class size, 47, 48, 96, 109, 141, 150–151
Collaboration, unauthorized, 9, 10–11, 17, 18, 19, 20, 27, 55, 84, 86, 88, 97–98, 103–104, 107, 109, 138
see also Examinations, answer copying
Communication, 48, 51, 59–60, 63, 138–141
classroom discussions, 55–58, 83–85, 105, 107, 131, 138–139
content, 57–58, 83–85
goals, 56–57
of expectations for behavior, 21–22, 74–75, 84, 86, 89, 93, 94–95, 109
see also Syllabus
Computers, 86–87, 88, 90, 91, 92, 95, 101, 102
see also Electronic devices
Course workload, 50

D
Dishonesty
workplace, 5–6, 11
see also Academic dishonesty
Distance education, 47, 49, 106–108

E
Educational institutions
characteristics and academic dishonesty, 29, 31–32
curricula, 151
learning vs product oriented, 150–151
missions, 5, 145–147
public confidence, 6
reputation, 6
see also Institutional policy
Electronic devices, 95, 97, 103, 104
see also Computers
Equity theory, 44–45
Evaluation of student performance, 46, 52–53, 65–66, 67
see also Examinations; Grading
Examinations, 66–67

-167-

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