The Ballad of America: The History of the United States in Song and Story

By John Anthony Scott | Go to book overview

Introduction

During the past ten years, there has been a great revival of interest in traditional music in America. Sales of folk song records run into the millions. Guitars today are as numerous on college campuses as bicycles, sometimes more so. The Newport Folk Festival of 1964 impressed its organizers with attendance of seventy thousand enthusiasts, mostly young, at its sessions. Magazines dealing with folk songs and their performers have burgeoned. Sing Out alone, which appears five times a year, has a circulation of approximately forty thousand. Itinerant singers find large and receptive audiences on college campuses, in high school and elementary school assemblies, and in summer camps. The coffee house has both reflected and promoted the folk song revival. College students, playing to packed audiences, have begun to stage their own folk festivals and "hoots." "Folk" is invading the academic curriculum: Several major universities now offer courses and degrees in folklore.

The passion for folk music is manifested primarily among young people, but it would be wrong to dismiss it as merely a youthful craze, a new fad, or as a form of youthful protest. In fact, the revival is a search for roots, for a sense of identity, for a concept of the world we live in, for a vision of the future. The meaning of American nationality, of American ideals, of dedication to America, are all involved.

This book is an attempt to show how the story of the American people is revealed in their song; to provide an introduction to this national song heritage, and to indicate its extent, variety, and beauty; to make some little-known singing materials easily and cheaply available; and, in response to many requests, to provide historical songs for use at various levels of the educational system.

The book had its origins in a course given by Bill Bonyun and the author at the 16th Annual Seminars on American Culture under the sponsorship of the New York State Historical Association, Cooperstown 1963. It represents an expansion of the thoughts presented at Cooperstown, together with a transcription of a number of the songs used by way of illustration.

The songs in this book, chosen from literally thousands, had to pass rather rigid selection tests. I sought songs that conveyed most clearly, most typically, a given national mood or experience; that were examples of the finest melodies and lyrics available; and that had proved their effectiveness and

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Ballad of America: The History of the United States in Song and Story
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Ballad of America - The History of the United States in Song and Story *
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Music xiii
  • I - The Colonial Period 1
  • The British Heritage 7
  • Colonial Songs and Ballads 30
  • II - The American Revolution 53
  • III - The Early National Period 91
  • IV - Jacksonian America 124
  • Sea and Immigration 126
  • The Westward Movement 159
  • Slavery Days 190
  • V - The Civil War 216
  • VI - Between the Civil War and the First World War 253
  • Farmers and Workers 257
  • Immigrants 284
  • The Negro People 301
  • VII - Between Two World Wars 324
  • VIII - Since the War 362
  • Sources 381
  • Recordings 400
  • Afterword 419
  • Index of Titles and First Lines 429
  • General Index 433
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 439

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.