The Ballad of America: The History of the United States in Song and Story

By John Anthony Scott | Go to book overview

Index of Titles and First Lines
NOTE: Titles of songs are in italics. When a song title and first line are exactly the same, only the title is given. Titles followed by an asterisk have no accompaniment.
A farmer was ploughing his field one day, 152
A is for axe and that we all know, 173
Across the Western Ocean, 150-151
Ain’t gonna let nobody, Lawdy, turn me’ round, 374
Alas! for the pleasant peace we knew, 243
All the Pretty Little Horses, 204-205
An American frigate, a frigate of fame, 82
Another Man Done Gone*, 307-308
As I went a-walking one fine sum- mer’s morning, 276
Away from Mississippi’s vale, 214
Ballad of the Boll Weevil, The*, 316-318
Ballad of Major AndrU+E9, The, 84-87
Banks of Newfoundland, The, 145- 147
Battle of the Kegs, The, 77-80
Battle of Trenton, The, 72-74
Bawbee Allen*, 5, 7-8
Blood-red Roses*, 132-134
Bonnie Lass o’ Fyvie, The, 20-22
Bonny Blue Flag, The, (Southern), 218, 220
Bonny Boy, The*, 2, 16, 18-19, 173, 270
Bonny Bunch of Roses On, The*, 105-107
Bound to Go, 202-203
Brennan on the Moor, 258, 264-266
Build high, build wide your prison wall, 370
Bull Connor’s Jail, 372-373
By the border of the ocean, 105
CaitilU+EDn NU+ED UallachaU+EDn (Cathaleen ni Houlihan)*,94-96
Castle of Dromore, The (Caislean Droim an OU+EDr), 154-155
Chesapeake and the Shannon, The, 111-112
Colorado Trail, The, 262
Come all of you bold shanty boys and list while I relate, 175
Come all of you good workers, 344
Come all you brave Americans, 85
Come all ye young men all, let this delight you, 37
Come, My Love, 32-34
Constitution and GuerriU+E8re, The, 108- 110
Could we desert you now, 224
D-Day Dodgers, 358-359
Death of General Wolfe, The, 4, 5, 36-38
Devil and the Farmer, The, 152-153
Die Moorsoldaten (Peat-Bog Sol- diers), 354-355
Discrimination Blues*, 350-351
Down Chesapeake Bay from Balti- more, 186
Down in Alabama, 372
Dying Californian, The, 183, 187-189
Dying Redcoat, The, 69-71
Every morning at half past four, 274
Eyes like the morning star, 262
Far and wide as the eye can wander, 354
Farewell, fellow servants, Oho! Oho! 206
Farmer Is The Man, The, 267-269
Farmer’s Curst Wife, The (The Devil and The Farmer), 152-153
Fate of John Burgoyne, The, 75-76
Flag of the Free, 224-225
Folks on t’Other Side the Wave, The, 62-63
Fools of Forty-Nine, The, 182-185
From frontier to frontier, 356
Gallants attend, and hear a friend, 78
General Lee’s Wooing, 233-235
Godamighty Drag, 309-311
Goin’ Down the Road, 346-347
Golden Vanity, The, 138-139
Goodbye, Old Paint, 263
Green Douglas firs where the waters break through, 348
Green Grow the Rushes O, 97-99
Greenland Whale Fishery, The, 142- 144

-429-

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The Ballad of America: The History of the United States in Song and Story
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Ballad of America - The History of the United States in Song and Story *
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Music xiii
  • I - The Colonial Period 1
  • The British Heritage 7
  • Colonial Songs and Ballads 30
  • II - The American Revolution 53
  • III - The Early National Period 91
  • IV - Jacksonian America 124
  • Sea and Immigration 126
  • The Westward Movement 159
  • Slavery Days 190
  • V - The Civil War 216
  • VI - Between the Civil War and the First World War 253
  • Farmers and Workers 257
  • Immigrants 284
  • The Negro People 301
  • VII - Between Two World Wars 324
  • VIII - Since the War 362
  • Sources 381
  • Recordings 400
  • Afterword 419
  • Index of Titles and First Lines 429
  • General Index 433
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