Chu Hsi and Neo-Confucianism

By Wing-Tsit Chan | Go to book overview

18

An Analysis of Chu Hsi's System
of Thought of I

CHANG LIWEN

THE SUBSTANCE in the logical structure of Chu Hsi's philosophy is his system of thought of Ia (Changes). Delving into such categories as T'ai-chab (supreme ultimate), yin-yangc (passive and active cosmic forces), and kang-roud (strength and weakness and fluctuation) of Chu Hsi's theory of Changes will facilitate not only an exposition of Chu Hsi's philosophy but also a search for the law of development in the history of Sung (960-1279)-Ming (1368-1644) Neo‐ Confucianism.


I

I-chinge (Book of changes) is a work which is simple and terse in its language but comprehensive and rich in its meaning, and so it is capable of being extended and developed. Scholars and philosophers of past ages have annotated the I-ching in their respective lights and from their own views inconsistent with the original meaning of the classic. Several schools came into being. Since the Ch'in and Han dynasties (221 B.C.-A.D. 220), there have been the so-called Yin-yang-chiaf (school that explained the I in terms of yin-yang doctrine), Tao-chiag (school that dealt with the I-ching in a Taoist way), Ch'an-wei chiah (school that illustrated the I-ching in a necromantic language), Hsüan‐ hsüeh-chiai (school that expressed the idea of Changes in an abstruse way), Lihsüeh-chiaj (school that expounded the I-ching in accordance with Neo-Confucianism), and so on. Of these schools some held that the I-ching should be interpreted by means of necromancy and others suggested that it should be explained in accordance with moral principles. Each of them had its own view in regard to how to interpret the I-ching. Chu Hsi commented on them thus, "Ever since the times of Ch'in and Han, those who devoted their study to the illustrations of the Book of Changes followed a bigoted course of emblems and numbers, failing to adopt an approach of comprehensiveness and simplicity, while those who talked about moral principles were confined to mere empty talk, far from being in consonance with the theme of humaneness, righteousness, moderation, and uprightness." 1 Obviously, Chu Hsi agrees neither with

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Chu Hsi and Neo-Confucianism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 644

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.