The Roman Eastern Frontier and the Persian Wars (AD 226-363): A Documentary History

By Michael H. Dodgeon; Samuel N. C. Lieu | Go to book overview

Appendix 1 Select passages from sources in Arabic and New Persian

(1) al-Tabari,1Annales, pp. 813-45, edd. Earth—Nöldeke (German trans. Nöldeke, pp. 1-68) (Arabic)

Since Alexander’s capture of Babylon five hundred and twenty-three years had passed, according to the reckonings of Christians and adherents of the older revelations, two hundred and sixty-six years, according to the reckonings of the magi, when Ardashir rose up, the son of Pabak Shah, king of Chir, son of the younger Sasan, son of Sasan, son of Pabak, son of Mihrmas (?), son of Sasan, son of king Bahman, son of Spendijar, [N., p. 2] son of Bistasp, son of Lohrasp, son of Kai Ogi (?), son of Kai Manus. According to other information however his family tree is: Ardashir—Pabak—Sasan—Pabak—Zarar—Behafridh—the older Sasan—Bahman—Spendijar—Bistasp—Lohrasp. Well, [N., p. 3] he arose, as he maintained, [p. 814] to avenge the blood of his cousin Dara (i.e. Darius)—son of Dara, grandson of Spendijar—who made war against Alexander and who was murdered by his two servants. As he explained, he wished to restore power to the legitimate family, to establish authority as it had been in the days of his ancestors, who had lived before the Diadoche, and to unite the empire under one head and one king again. It is said that he was born in a village called Tirudih, which belongs to the region of Chir and to the administrative area of Istakhr. His grandfather, Sasan, was such a brave and courageous man, [N., p. 4] that he once fought single-handed against eighty strong and vigorous men of Istakhr and put them to flight. His wife came from the house of Bazrangi, a king’s family in Pars; she was called Rambehist and was a beautiful, excellent woman. Sasan was overseer of a fire-temple in Istakhr,

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