The Roman Eastern Frontier and the Persian Wars (AD 226-363): A Documentary History

By Michael H. Dodgeon; Samuel N. C. Lieu | Go to book overview

Notes

1 THE RISE OF THE SASSANIANS
1
The Cadusaei were originally a proto-Median tribe who dwelt on the south-west coast of the Caspian Sea. See also pp. 368, n. 54.
2
The genealogy of Ardashir presented by Agathias is different from that given by Shapur I for his father on his Great Inscription. According to the latter, Ardashir was the son of King Papak (ŠKZ, Gk line 1, see p. 35), a certain Denak was mother of King Papak and a Radak was mother of Ardashir, King of Kings (line 55). Sasan was simply honoured as a lord, his name coming before that of Papak (line 46) but specifying no relation. Frye (1983:116-17) suggests that Sasan might have been the natural father of Ardashir, but the latter was adopted by Papak either after the death of Sasan or that of his own son Shapur. The version of Agathias appears to have been derived from a tradition which is also found in the Kārnāmak i Artaxšēr i Papakan (Book of Deeds of Ardashir, son of Papak) and is transmitted to later writers like Tabari and Firdawsi through the Khwaday-namagh (Book of Lords)—a fairly official historical work (now lost) which covered Persian history from its beginnings to the end of Khusrau II’s reign (AD 628) and compiled under Yazdgird III (631-57). Cf. Cameron, 1969-70:112-17 and 136-7; Widengren, 1971:714-25; Frye, 1984a: 266-7; and Felix, 1985:25.
3
The most decisive of the engagements was fought at Hormizdagān (near mod. Gulgayagan, between Isfahan and Nihawand, cf. Widengren 1971:743) where Artabanus was killed. According to the chronology established by Nöldeke, the battle took place some time in September, AD 224. A more precise date, and one which is often encountered, is given by the so-called Chronicle of Arbela (Chronicon Ecclesiae Arbelae) attributed to Msiha-Zkha. First published by Mingana in 1907, the relevant part of this Syriac work says (ed. Kawerau, CSCO 467, pp. 29−30=Mingana, pp. 28-9):

The Parthians showed themselves to be strong and powerful and proud that they sought only murder, but God who has said through his prophet: Though you soar aloft like the eagle, though your nest is set among the stars, thence I will bring you down…’ (Obadiah

-349-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Roman Eastern Frontier and the Persian Wars (AD 226-363): A Documentary History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 432

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.