New Deal Labor Policy and the American Industrial Economy

By Stanley Vittoz | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Authors customarily acquire many debts in the course of writing their books, and my own case is no exception. I wish to express my appreciation to the numerous archivists and librarians who skillfully and patiently assisted my research efforts; to John Schlosser, who took time out from his own studies at Stanford University to examine local sources on my behalf; to Wilhelm Fink Verlag München, publishers of Amerikastudien, and Geron-X, Inc., publishers of Politics and Society, for permission to adapt material that originally appeared in those journals; to Pat Gorman and Joan Plonski for typing the penultimate draft of the manuscript; and to Lewis Bateman and the rest of the editorial staff at the University of North Carolina Press for their expert professional guidance throughout the publishing process. I also was fortunate in having financial support for one or another phase of the study from the Hoover Presidential Library Association, the Dalhousie University Research Development Fund, and the Adolph G. Rosengarten Fund, Department of History, University of Pennsylvania.

Although any errors in either fact or interpretation that remain are mine alone, this book would be a far less creditable contribution to historical scholarship than it is without the insight that I gained from discussions with many friends and colleagues who took an interest in my work. I am especially grateful to Lee Benson, Fred Block, Steve Fraser, Ellis Hawley, and Michael Katz for their helpful criticism and unflagging encouragement as this project neared completion. To both Gabriel Kolko and Norman Pollack, who taught me the importance of striving to attain an independent critical vision, I owe a debt of intellectual inspiration that extends far beyond the scope of the ideas presented here. Most of all I wish to thank Julia Lynn Vittoz, whose discerning advice and tremendous personal generosity are embodied in every dimension of the effort that was invested in producing this volume.

Beijing
February 1986

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