Wilson and His Peacemakers: American Diplomacy at the Paris Peace Conference, 1919

By Arthur Walworth | Go to book overview

Foreword

THE word diplomacy can be a will-o'-the-wisp and may mislead those who would study the work of diplomats. The word in common usage may connote nothing more than tact or savoir faire, with perhaps an implication of guile. Often it is applied with imprecision to the relations of governments of states. It should not be used as a synonym for foreign policy, which gives direction and purpose to intercourse among governments. Nor should it be identified with international law, which supplies a common understanding of rights and precedents. Properly, according to The Oxford English Dictionary, diplomacy is "the management of international relations by negotiations."

The present work has to do with the performance of those Americans who took part in the essential task of negotiating peace treaties that would bring World War I to an end. My study was undertaken in response to a suggestion made twenty-five years ago by Charles Seymour, who was himself an American delegate at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 and the author of American Diplomacy during the World War. He was most generous of advice, as was Frank Lord Warrin, who was the personal assistant to David Hunter Miller, the legal counselor of Wilson. These men and many others have contributed much during the years of waiting for the opening of the last of the essential documentary sources in the United States and abroad. Most fortunately, the quarter century of my research has been a period during which many of the eyewitnesses have still been alive to testify, and also a time when the last of the essential files of state and personal documents have been opened.

Several years after the release of the official American and British minutes of the sessions of the inner councils of the Paris conference, two volumes were published that made available the notes of Paul Mantoux, Clemenceau's translator, who faithfully recorded in French the words of the conferees as they were spoken in the meetings of the Supreme Council. For access to these and other important notes of Professor Mantoux, I am deeply indebted to Mme. Mathilde Mantoux, whose encouragement and assistance have been constant and indispensable. I have been aided also at Paris by Professors Pierre Renouvin, Jean-Baptiste Duroselle, and André Kaspi.

Cary T. Grayson Jr., Ambassador Philip Bonsal, and Professor Agnes Headlam‐ Morley of Oxford have generously facilitated the use of the intimate records of their fathers. Katherine E. Brand, who years ago reviewed my notes from the Wilson Collection at the Library of Congress, has remained a faithful counselor. Colonel James B. Rothnie has transcribed notes written in shorthand by Wilson. Professor Arthur S. Link and David W. Hirst have been most accommodating in sharing the

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wilson and His Peacemakers: American Diplomacy at the Paris Peace Conference, 1919
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 618

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.