Wilson and His Peacemakers: American Diplomacy at the Paris Peace Conference, 1919

By Arthur Walworth | Go to book overview

Bibliography

The official American documents that bear upon the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 are of enor- mous volume and are located in several archives. Thousands have been printed in one or both of two basic collections: (1) Papers Relating to the For- eign Relations of the United States, 1918 and 1919 series, Paris Peace Conference series and Lansing Papers, vol. 2 (published by the State Department, Washington, D.C.); and (2) My Diary, by David Hunter Miller, consisting of twenty-one volumes (repr. Peter Smith, Gloucester, Mass.). Miller, in editing his twenty-one volumes, drew upon his papers in the Library of Congress.

I have searched the files from which the docu- ments in the above compilations were taken and have made use of some papers not previously printed. Moreover, I have drawn upon relevant documents of the Treasury Department, both those in the National Archives and those in the "Peace Commission" file in the Bureau of Accounts. In many cases it has been possible to compare the written record with oral testimony from interviews granted to me by men who wrote the documents. Witnesses who have contributed information in an interview or by correspondence, other than those whose papers are listed below, are Philip Noel- Baker, Sir James R. M. Butler, François Charles- Roux, Robert H. George, Andrew Géraud ("Per- tinax"), Ulysses S. Grant III, Lord Hankey, Mrs. J. Borden Harriman, Wunsz King, Arthur Krock, David Lawrence, Eleanor Wilson McAdoo, Fran- cis C. MacDonald, René Massigli, George Ber- nard Noble, Bliss Perry, William Phillips, André Portier, René de St. Quentin, Sir Arthur Salter, Francis B. Sayre, Herbert Bayard Swope, Arnold Toynbee, and Mona House Tucker.

The following collections have been used; and in many cases I have talked with those who cre- ated them.

In the Library of Congress the papers of these people: Carl Ackerman, General Henry T. Allen, Newton D. Baker, Ray Stannard Baker, Admiral William S. Benson, General Tasker H. Bliss, Ste- phen Bonsal, Admiral Mark Bristol, Frank I. Cobb, George Creel, Josephus Daniels, Norman H. Davis, Raymond B. Fosdick, Felix Frankfurter, Hunting- ton Gilchrist, Thomas W. Gregory, Charles S. Hamlin, Leland Harrison, Ralph Hayes, Edith Benham Helm, Gilbert Hitchcock, Irwin H. Hoo- ver, Philip C. Jessup, Robert Lansing, Henry Cabot Lodge, Breckinridge Long, Charles O. Maas, William G. McAdoo, Theodore Marburg, David Hunter Miller, John Bassett Moore, Henry Mor- genthau, Roland S. Morris, General John J. Persh- ing, Elihu Root, Arthur Sweetser, William Howard Taft, Joseph P. Tumulty, Henry White, William Allen White, Edith Bolling Wilson, Woodrow Wilson, Robert W. Woolley, and Lester H. Wool- sey.

At Yale University in the Manuscripts and Archives division of the Sterling Memorial Library: the Edward M. House Collection, designated in this book as "Y.H.C." and including the diaries and papers of Edward M. House; also the papers of Gordon Auchincloss, William H. Buckler, Wil- liam C. Bullitt, John W. Davis, Walter G. Davis, Clive Day, Arthur Hugh Frazier, Edward M. House, Walter Lippmann, Vance McCormick, Wallace Notestein, Frank L. Polk, Charles Seymour, Sir Arthur Willert, Sir William Wiseman, and Wil- liam Yale; also at the Yale Library, certain docu- ments of the Inquiry, microfilms of the papers of Sidney Sonnino, and papers of Willard Straight.

At Princeton University in the Firestone Library: the papers of Bernard M. Baruch, Ray Stannard Baker, Gilbert F. Close, John Foster Dulles, Dr. Albert Lamb, Robert Lansing, and Charles L. Swem; and in the Mudd Library, the papers of Allen W. Dulles and Charles H. Haskins.

At Harvard University in the Houghton Library: the papers of Ellis L. Dresel, Joseph C. Grew, Walter Hines Page, William Phillips, Leon Trot- sky, and Oswald Garrison Villard; in the Widener Library archives, the papers of Archibald Cary Coolidge; in the Baker Library, the papers of Thomas W. Lamont.

At Columbia University: in the Butler Library: the papers of V. K. Wellington Koo, Sidney E. Mezes, James T. Shotwell, and Henry White, the diaries of George Louis Beer and William L. Wes- termann; and records of Boris A. Bakhmeteff, William Phillips, DeWitt Poole, James T. Shot- well, and others in the Oral History Research Office.

At Stanford University: in the Hoover Institu- tion Archives: the papers of Edwin F. Gay, Hugh Gibson, Stanley K. Hornbeck, Vance C. McCormick. Ignace Jan Paderewski, and Brand Whitlock, and the Records of the American Relief Administration.

At the Duke University Library: the papers of Thomas Nelson Page.

At the Georgetown University Library: the papers of James Brown Scott.

At the Massachusetts Historical Society: the

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