The Poetry of T. S. Eliot

By D. E. S. Maxwell | Go to book overview

Chapter Seven
Poésie du Départ

1. THE PERSONAL ELEMENT

THE title 'Poésie du Départ' is perhaps somewhat misleading, for it is applied usually to a specific aspect of French symbolist poetry, the vague nostalgic regret associated with voyages and departures, a regret that is at the same time exhilarating. The poetry to which it refers here, however, illustrates that deeper meaning of which, Eliot says, Baudelaire had some fleeting conception in parts of his work -- notably Mon Cœur Mis à Nu. The phrase implies in this context Eliot's departure from the beliefs of his earlier poems to full acceptance of the Christian faith. In 'Marina' the departure makes use of Baudelaire's symbol (see p. 55), but this is a secondary matter, for the departure is more obviously concerned with a particular spiritual concept. That Eliot should divert his sympathies from the urban element in Baudelaire's poetry to his glimpses of beatitude, is symptomatic of the change in Eliot himself. It is paralleled in his turning from Dante's Inferno and Purgatory to his Paradiso, which is of more lasting value to Eliot's poetry. The parallel is not entirely valid, but we can see the links forged by Eliot between, firstly, Baudelaire's city and Dante's Limbo, then between Dante's Paradiso and Baudelaire's glimpses of the divine, less assured and less sustained though they were. Eliot does not abandon his early masters. But he continues to admire them for reasons different from those which first attracted him to them.

-136-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Poetry of T. S. Eliot
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Chapter One - The Critical Background 1
  • Chapter Two - The New Classicism 36
  • Chapter Three - Symbolism and the Unified Sensibility 48
  • Chapter Four - Poetry and Beliefs 80
  • Chapter Five - The Turning World 97
  • Chapter Six - The Humanist Criticism 118
  • Chapter Seven - Poésie Du Départ 136
  • Chapter Eight - The Still Point 156
  • Chapter Nine - Realism and Poetic Drama 181
  • Appendix 213
  • Bibliography 219
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 223

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.