Health Resources in the United States: Personnel, Facilities, and Services

By George W. Bachman | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The individuals and agencies who assisted in the collection of materials are literally too numerous to mention. Apart from the hundreds of organizations that responded to questionnaires, scores of representatives from all quarters of the health and welfare fields wrote extensive communications to members of the staff, and many of them were contacted personally. In several instances complete statistical reports were submitted. Acknowledgment of contributions that were used are made in the respective sections of the text.

We wish to make special mention here of the contributions that were especially helpful to the staff but will not be used until subsequent publications. Representatives of many of the major labor unions furnished materials on union health plans. The Maryland State Planning Commission, the Michigan Health Council, and the Tennessee Department of Public Health conducted extensive surveys of health services in industry; the Maryland study has been published by the Commission. The report of the survey by the National Association of Manufacturers appears in part in Chapter X of this volume; portions relating to problems other than the factual inventory will be valuable in later studies. We regret that many employees who personally worked up the materials used remain anonymous because of agency authorship in the citations to their materials. This is especially true of the many reports submitted by persons in the Public Health Service and other branches of the Federal Security Agency, the Veterans Administration, the Department of Defense, the Indian Bureau, Bureau of the Budget, and the Atomic Energy Commission. It is also true of the state directors of health and welfare departments who responded to a questionnaire on medical care in public assistance programs, and of the scores of officials of voluntary agencies and professional associations. A large body of data on the cost and financing of health programs, submitted by insurance companies, and other private and governmental agencies, will be useful in later studies.

Within the Brookings Institution, especial credit is due to A. Evelyn Breck for extensive collaboration as editor, and to Gene Anderson and Amy Hoskins for assistant and secretarial services.

George W. Bachman

-vii-

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Health Resources in the United States: Personnel, Facilities, and Services
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Brookings Institution ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Tables xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Health of the Nation: Vital Statistics 5
  • Chapter I - Health Progress Since 1900 9
  • Chapter II - Variations in the Level of Health 14
  • Part II - Personnel 55
  • Chapter III - Physicians, Dentists, Nurses 60
  • Chapter V - Medical Group Practice 96
  • Part III - Facilities and Services 111
  • Chapter VI - Hospitals and Related Facilities 114
  • Chapter VII - Specified Diseases and Disabilities 135
  • Chapter VIII - Environmental Health 199
  • Chapter IX - Special Beneficiary Classes 215
  • Chapter X - Health Service in Industry 241
  • Appendixes 277
  • Index 333
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