Health Resources in the United States: Personnel, Facilities, and Services

By George W. Bachman | Go to book overview

Chapter IX
SPECIAL BENEFICIARY CLASSES

The health resources described in this chapter have been established and developed apart from the resources available to the gen ­eral population, and their use is limited to special classes who are eligible by virtue of their legal or social status. These classes include military personnel, veterans, Indians, and the beneficiaries, mostly seamen, of the United States Public Health Service hospital system. Excluded from consideration are the specialized systems or programs of care that are available to persons in certain disease categories, such as tuberculosis and mental illness, and the programs for the care of indigents.

The special classes discussed are beneficiaries of services provided by the federal government. Members of these classes represented nearly one sixth of the population in 1950, but in some classes, especially the veterans group, not all members were eligible for service in federal facilities. A daily average of one out of eleven patients in the nation's hospitals in 1950 was a member of one of these special beneficiary classes. To provide services for them there were nearly 200,000 persons employed in more than 500 hospitals with about 168,000 beds, and more than 1,000 outpatient facilities and other installations. About 59 per cent of the federal health budget in the fiscal year 1950 was devoted to their inpatient and outpatient care, and an additional 14 per cent was obligated for hospital construction.


HEALTH SERVICE IN THE ARMED FORCES1

The mission of the military health services is to conserve the strength of the armed forces. In time of war or major catastrophe there are certain environmental and administrative factors which modify the application of medical practice. Among these factors are the strategy of troop movements, the geography of combat, the numerical mass of casualties, and the specific problems of surface or submarine existence or the human response to the supersonic speed of aircraft. The task of providing health services in a military setting requires a unique organization of health resources.

____________________
1
Based on materials furnished by the Armed Forces Medical Policy Council, U. S. Department of Defense.

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Health Resources in the United States: Personnel, Facilities, and Services
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.