Teaching and Learning in the Early Years

By David Whitebread | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6

‘You be de and I’ll be de…’

LANGUAGE, NARRATIVE AND IMAGINATIVE PLAY

Jenny Daniels

Carol Fox (1993) has shown how young children can tell imaginative fantasy stories playing themselves into the discourses of literature and literacy. They make maximal use of written stories heard from books, long before they can read and write themselves. This chapter looks at another context for language learning—the point at which the child becomes a pupil and has to ‘read’ the discourses of the classroom. Margaret Meek (1989) has used the term, ‘what goes here?’ to describe the way in which children are encultured into different social contexts, in this case the classroom culture. As part of these learning processes, I want to argue for the importance of creative play in the infant classroom, and emphasise the benefits of children using narrative play with the encouragement and support of an actively involved educator.


Stories heard in the infant classroom

Sixty or so faces looked intently at the brightly striped puppet theatre standing in the corner of the classroom. The afternoon was hot and sticky, the children wriggled and shuffled to make themselves cooler and more comfortable. A teacher looked on indulgently from the doorway. There was no need for her intervention, they were all absorbed in the puppet play. She went off to join her colleagues, preparing for the school fete at the weekend.

A typical event in the life of an infant school. Nothing remarkable, the children enjoying the entertainment provided by the puppet plays. I was there with a group of nursery nurses from the local college, helping them to

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching and Learning in the Early Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 354

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.