A Nation Transformed by Information: How Information Has Shaped the United States from Colonial Times to the Present

By Alfred D. Chandler Jr.; James W. Cortada | Go to book overview

Index
A.B. Dick, 123-124
Abolitionists, free speech not blocked, 50
Access, data on home PCs, 265-271
Accountants, expansion of profession (1875- 1930s), 111-112; used Comptometers, 122
Accounting, in nineteenth century small firms, 17; railroad practices, 109; why an early computer application, 230, 232-236
Adams, John, 47; pro-status quo, 42
Adams, John Quincy, 50, 59; quoted on embargo of information, 68
Adams, Samuel, pro-status quo, 42; role in Committee of Correspondence, 45
Adding machines, arrival of, 120-121
Adoption criteria for new technology, 179- 180
Advanced Micro Devices, 31; chip market share (1994), 34
Advertising, on radio, 157-159; on TV, 168- 169; role of agencies during World War II, 161; used by public officials (1917-1918), 156
Affiliation, Internet used to create, 275, 277- 279
African-Americans, free members published views (early 1800s), 52
Ages, concept of, 3-7
Agriculture, information about helped early radio, 149; sale via telegraph, 82-83
Aiken, Howard, 189
Aitken, Hugh G.H., quoted about RCA, 22
Albion, Robert, on Cotton Triangle, 8
Allied Signal, 249
Almanacs, role in colonial times, 40
ALOHAnet, 229
Altair 8800, 260
America Online (AOL), 37, 263; courted households, 264
American Bible Society, 49
American Broadcasting Company (ABC), 172; origins of, 22
American Revolution, protection of expression and press, 6; role of information in age of, 42-47
American System, Clay’s idea for, 8
American Tract Society, 49
Amazon. Com, 244
Amdahl, Gene, role of, 29
American Bell Telephone Company, 87, 89, 91
American District Telegraph Company, 77
American Marconi, 146
American Speaking Telephone Company, 90- 91
American Telephone and Telegraph (ATT), 173, 140, 143, 146, 192; acquired TCI (1998), 288; antitrust wars, 207; became Bell’s parent company, 15; decision to license transistor patents, 177-178; developed UNIX, 35; early history of, 87- 100; electric-based products and, 20, 21; example of evolution of American technology, 178; knowledge management software used by, 249; newly formed (1880s), 284; radio broadcasting business of (1920s), 148; signs with TI to make transistor radio, 31; Vail learned from railroad experience, 72
American Writing Machine Company, 114
Amos ‘n’ Andy, 154
Analysis, emergence of new technologies for (1800s), 120-121

-363-

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