4

ON SIGNIFICATION

INTRODUCTION

This chapter has two interrelated objectives. The first, in light of the problems identified in the previous two chapters, is to reconsider the definition of the concept of racism. This will involve a clarification of the relationship between the concept of racism and a number of related concepts, principally ‘race’, ethnicity, racialisation, ethnicisation and institutional racism. Second, it is instructive to reflect on these related concepts themselves - although we emphasise the problematic nature of the concept of ‘race’, it is not the only problematic concept in this field of study.

These objectives will be realised by reflecting theoretically on the nature of the social process by which meanings are attributed to real or imagined human characteristics. Thus, a concept of racism will be derived analytically rather than inductively from consideration of a single empirical instance. This theoretical work will produce no more than a concept of racism, and it makes a concession to (the entirely respectable philosophical doctrine of) essentialism by identifying what many different instances of racism have in common qua racism. On the specificity of each instance, the variety of representational content and context, and ‘grounded’ discussions of the nature and definition of racism, these are matters for historically and ethnographically specific analysis, examples of which are discussed in Chapters 5 and 6.

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Racism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • I 1
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Representations of the Other 19
  • II 55
  • 2 - The Unity of Racism- A Critique of Conceptual Inflation 57
  • 3 - The Diversity of Racism- A Critique of Conceptual Deflation 73
  • 4 - On Signification 87
  • III 115
  • 5 - Racism and Class Relations 117
  • 6 - Racism, the Nation State and Globalisation 142
  • Conclusion 169
  • Further Reading 173
  • Bibliography 176
  • Index 194
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.