The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2

By Cathal J. Nolan | Go to book overview

Suggested Reading:
Arthur Waldron, The Great Wall of China (1990).
Great War (1914–1918). A term commonly used about World War I, but only until the world was again astonished, battered, and broken by the even greater horror, moral and physical destruction, and shaking of nations called World War II.
Great White Fleet (1907–1909). On December 16, 1907, Theodore Roosevelt dispatched the Great White Fleet—sixteen frontline U.S. battleships, along with escorts—on a goodwill circumnavigation of the globe. The central purpose of the tour was to acquire prestige and influence for the United States through a display of America’s ascendant naval power. Under Roosevelt’s generous and farsighted guidance, the U.S. Navy had emerged as a formidable force in its own right as well as a junior partner to the Royal Navy. After the Russo-Japanese War (1904–1905), he thought it especially important to bring home this point to Japan. Additionally, the tour focused the public’s attention on the navy and the country’s expanded foreign policy interests. The Fleet returned on February 22, 1909.
Great Zimbabwe. This was a stone-building, gold-producing, cattle-rearing, and Indian Ocean–trading indigenous African civilization that dated back at least to c. 1150 C.E. in the region of modern Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and the Transvaal. More than 200 distinct ruin sites have been found, the most important of which, Great Zimbabwe, was probably a royal palace site or temple complex extending over 60 acres. It achieved real prosperity in the early thirteenth century, mostly from cattle and farming but also from trading gold with Arab merchants along the Sofala coast. The Shona capital was located at Great Zimbabwe but was abandoned as the whole kingdom migrated north, probably in the late fifteenth century, several decades before the Portuguese arrived to establish trade relations in, and take slaves from, the region in the 1560s. The Mwene Mutapa governed from the new northern site, though with increasing interference from the Portuguese. In the eighteenth century the area was overtaken by a rival center of power in Butwa. The remnant of Great Zimbabwe was overrun in 1832 by Nguni peoples displaced by the Mfecane.
Greece. It was home to a great, classical civilization of city-states and later was an integral part of the Roman Empire. It then was the center of the great, eastern half of the Roman Empire, better known as the Byzantine Empire with

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The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • F 530
  • Suggested Reading: 534
  • Suggested Readings: 547
  • Suggested Reading: 548
  • Suggested Reading: 557
  • Suggested Readings: 571
  • Suggested Readings: 572
  • Suggested Reading: 573
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  • G 601
  • Suggested Reading: 604
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  • H 681
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  • I 752
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  • J 846
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  • K 884
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  • L 927
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