The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2

By Cathal J. Nolan | Go to book overview

Suggested Readings:
Efraim Karsh and Inari Rautsi, Saddam Hussein: A Political Biography (1991); Peter Slugglett and Marion Farouk Slugglett, Iraq Since 1958: From Revolution to Dictatorship (1990)
Hu Yaobang (1915–1989). Chinese reformer. A veteran of the Long March, his career was closely associated with that of Deng Xiaoping, with both suffering great vicissitudes of personal and political fortune under the erratic leadership of Mao Zedong. Having survived the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, he was made the scapegoat for student unrest in 1987 and dismissed. Two years later his death sparked demonstrations that culminated in the massacre at Tiananmen Square.
HvA (Hauptverwaltung Aufklärung). The foreign intelligenceservice of the German Democratic Republic. It was highly successful in penetrating West Germany’s intelligence services (BfV and BND), government, and industry.
Hyderabad. One of the largest Princely States in India, its Nizam was a Muslim, although its population was mostly Hindu. Entirely surrounded by India, for a year the Nizam refused to accede to India despite considerable pressure from Britain and the Congress Party. On September 13, 1948, Indian troops moved into Hyderabad and after four days of fighting it was forced into union with India. In 1956 it was broken up under administrative reforms that carved it into several states.
hydrogen bomb. Also called a “thermonuclear device” or weapon. These represent a second generation of nuclear weapons, using a fusion rather than primarily a fission reaction. First, fission energy comes from rapidly compressing a core of plutonium or uranium, encased in lithium and deuterium (heavy hydrogen). Neutrons released from the plutonium split lithium atoms into helium and tritium (another form of heavy hydrogen). It is the tritium and deuterium that fuse, again producing helium and other by-products plus the extraordinary energy of a hydrogen chain reaction explosion. The Soviet Union actually began research on the hydrogen bomb before the United States. They were first detonated by the United States (1952), followed by

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The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • F 530
  • Suggested Reading: 534
  • Suggested Readings: 547
  • Suggested Reading: 548
  • Suggested Reading: 557
  • Suggested Readings: 571
  • Suggested Readings: 572
  • Suggested Reading: 573
  • Suggested Reading: 582
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  • Suggested Readings: 590
  • Suggested Readings: 591
  • G 601
  • Suggested Reading: 604
  • Suggested Reading: 618
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  • Suggested Reading: 636
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  • Suggested Readings: 651
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  • H 681
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  • I 752
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  • J 846
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  • Suggested Readings: 872
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  • K 884
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  • L 927
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