The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2

By Cathal J. Nolan | Go to book overview

Suggested Reading:
Richard Rhodes, Dark Sun: The Making of the Hydrogen Bomb (1995).
hyperinflation. Runaway inflation that can reach figures of thousands or millions of percent per year or even per month. Few regimes can long survive the destruction of personal wealth and economic planning such inflation causes, particularly for the middle classes. Hyperinflation has plagued many Third World states, but among the most spectacular examples was the inflation that devastated Weimar Germany, where the mark reached 4.2 trillion to the dollar before it ceased to even function as currency. China suffered a terrible hyperinflation after 1945 during the Chinese Civil War. Runaway inflation threatened reforms in several former Communist countries, including Ukraine, in the 1990s. Serbian inflation hit four quadrillion percent per annum during 1993–1994. At such points of absurdity, hyperinflation reinforces itself, as people lose all faith in the currency and usually in the government as well. When that happens, a new currency must be introduced, with believable guarantees that it will not simply suffer the same fate.
“hyperpower.” A French term, “hyperpuissance,” which gained popular currency c. 2000. It merely exacerbated the problem of terminological inflation of the term it sought to replace: superpower.
hypothesis. (1) In quantitative analysis: A tentative assumption about relations among variables, put forward in the form of an equation, to explore and test its logical or empirical consequences. (2) In formal reasoning: Any proposition set forth as a provisional conjecture to guide further reasoning. (3) In unexamined argument: An unstated assumption implicit in one’s premise. (4) In daily discourse: A naked best guess, very often overdressed as a trenchant insight. See alsofalsification; null hypothesis.

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The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • F 530
  • Suggested Reading: 534
  • Suggested Readings: 547
  • Suggested Reading: 548
  • Suggested Reading: 557
  • Suggested Readings: 571
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  • G 601
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  • H 681
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  • I 752
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  • J 846
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  • K 884
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  • L 927
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