Charles A. Beard, An Intellectual Biography

By Ellen Nore | Go to book overview

8

Voyages to the Orient,
1922-1923

In February 1922 Beard was invited to Japan to conduct "an educational campaign" in the universities and among city officials for the modernization of municipal government and services. Yusuki Tsurumi, son-in-law of the mayor of Tokyo, Viscount Shimpei Goto, informed Beard that Tokyo was then establishing a Bureau of Municipal Research with money donated by a multimillionaire who had recently been assassinated. Tsurumi hoped that Beard would be in Japan by mid-September, when the autumn term at the universities began.

The invitation delighted the Beards, who had made many Japanese and Chinese friends at Columbia. Several of their acquaintances, including the Deweys and Frank Goodnow, had spent considerable time in the Far East. 1 Moreover, in 1918, Shimpei Goto had visited the New York Bureau of Municipal Research. Charles and Goto, whom Beard described as "Japan's Statesman of Research," had developed a close friendship. Goto, who was sixty-five in 1922, had had a notable career in the Japanese government. After graduating from the Medical School of Fukushima, he had finished his medical studies at the University of Berlin. He had been director of the Bureau of Health in the Japanese Home Department, Minister of Communications, head of the Imperial Railways, civilian governor of Formosa, president of the South Manchurian Railway, Minister of Home Affairs, Minister of Foreign Affairs, and, at the time of the Beards' arrival in 1922,

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