XIII.

Two Bosses—Khrushchev
and De Sapio

Mrs. Roosevelt paid for her intense involvement in the Stevenson campaign. The number of newspapers subscribing to her column was cut almost in half—from eighty to about forty.

The Scripps-Howard people have cancelled my column since the election in all of their papers, which leaves me with a reduced number of papers. Perhaps, if you and others who really miss the column would write in, individual papers might take it again but they will not do so without pressure. This is the result of my political activity but I am glad I did it just the same. 1

The cancellation meant a substantial diminution in income from the column—from $28,000 in 1956 to $9,630 in 1957. For a moment she thought that perhaps the time had come to give it up, but United Features Syndicate asked her not to, saying it would make an effort to pick up other papers. Although she was seventy-two, she was willing to cooperate. She liked the platform the column gave her. When Paul Butler, the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, asked her to join the advisory committee of party notables that he was establishing, she declined formal membership:

They [the United Features Syndicate] fear that the feeling would spread that whatever I said on political subjects would not represent my own thinking but the thinking of a political party group.... I think the column people are right in feeling that my influence will be greater, as I write a daily column, if I am not a full-fledged member of the Committee. 2

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Eleanor: The Years Alone
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Eleanor: the Years Alone *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Author's Note *
  • Preface *
  • I - Champion of Her Husband's Ideals *
  • II - The Hardest-Working Delegate *
  • III - A Magna Charta for Mankind *
  • IV - Reluctant Cold -Warrior *
  • V - The United Nations and a Jewish Homeland *
  • VI - The 1948 Campaign: a New Party—not a Third Party *
  • VII - Cardinal and Former First Lady *
  • VIII - An American Phenomenon *
  • IX - America's Best Ambassador *
  • X - Resignation Accepted *
  • XI - Private Citizen Again *
  • XII - "Madly for Adlai" *
  • XIII - Two Bosses—khrushchev and De Sapio *
  • XIV - A New Generation Takes Over *
  • XV - To the End, Courage *
  • Appendix A: - Eleanor Roosevelt and the Nobel Peace Prize *
  • Appendix B: - Mrs. Roosevelt and the Sultan of Morocco *
  • References *
  • Index *
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