Ethics and Values in Industrial-Organizational Psychology

By Joel Lefkowitz | Go to book overview

Series Foreword Series Editors
Edwin A. Fleishman
George Mason University
Jeanette N. Cleveland
Pennsylvania State University

There is a compelling need for innovative approaches to the solution of many pressing problems involving human relationships in today's society. Such approaches are more likely to be successful when they are based on sound research and applications. This Series in Applied Psychology offers publications that emphasize state-of-the-art research and its application to important issues of human behavior in a variety of societal settings. The objective is to bridge both academic and applied interests.

Recent years have seen an increasing interest in ethics and morality in various segments of our society. Current events have underscored the relevance of many of these issues for organizations and their management. This book, Ethics and Values in Industrial-Organizational Psychology by Joel Lefkowitz, is a major contribution to our discussion of beliefs and assumptions about ethics in the profession of psychology, especially industrial-organizational psychology, in the world of business, and in the nature of our society.

As one reviewer of the manuscript for this book pointed out “the timing for this book could hardly be better. Our culture is facing massive ethical crises in many sectors of society. Psychologists who work with organizations cannot escape being touched by these forces. ” This book deals with issues involved in our roles as applied psychologists working in complex social settings. These issues also include potential ethical dilemmas which may con

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