The Mental Health Professional and the New Technologies: A Handbook for Practice Today

By Marlene M. Maheu; Myron L. Puller et al. | Go to book overview

10
Standards and Guidelines

Thus conscience dooes make cowards And thus the native hiew of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pitch and moment With this regard their currents turn awry And loose the name of action.

(Shakespeare, Hamlet)
Act iii, Scene 1, Line 98

Mental health professionals thinking about using the psychotechnologies should review current ethical guidelines when considering practice innovations. The technological landscape is so diverse and changeable that most codes and rules are subjected to complaints, appeals, and desperate searches for loopholes by professionals and clients alike. Mental health professionals have only begun to collect data about the degree to which members believe in or comply with their professional associations' standards of conduct (e.g., Pope, Tabachnick, & Keith-Spiegel, 1987). Data are not readily available to inform either the clinical decisions of individual practitioners or the attempts of relevant professional associations to extend formal standards of practice to new areas, such as online clinical practice.

This chapter focuses on the many statements and publications of state and professional associations that address ethical issues related to online clinical practice. These documents contain essential information for mental health professionals considering practice in this area. Both the risks and the benefits of such practice are high. On one hand, enforcers and attorneys await the missteps of professionals who make uninformed decisions about online clinical practice. On the other hand, practitioners and patients look eagerly toward the possibilities inherent in new forms of service delivery.

Before we introduce relevant publications, let us remember how media can change perception. First, online clinical practice may markedly flatten the social hierarchy. Even though this result may be helpful in some circumstances, it may lower the barrier for a dissatisfied patient to initiate litigation. For example, when communicating through newspaper columns, radio, television, or stage, mental health professionals often try to reduce social unease by minimizing their status, such as by giving themselves a diminutive name— “Dr. Pat. However, the reverse is needed when using some technologies, particularly the text-based media. For instance, in communicating chiefly through e-mail, discussion forum, or chat room, the professional's image needs shoring up, not whittling down. The combination of ready accessibility, physical

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Mental Health Professional and the New Technologies: A Handbook for Practice Today
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 539

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.