The Mental Health Professional and the New Technologies: A Handbook for Practice Today

By Marlene M. Maheu; Myron L. Puller et al. | Go to book overview

14
The Near Future

Already late for his 8 a.m. meeting with Henley, Steve is sweating it out in the slow-traffic lane. As a stop-smoking ad comes on the radio, Steve jabs the button for the all-news station. Hearing his health insurance company promoting the new stress management feature on its Web site, Steve grimaces, lights a cigarette, and punches to a music station.

Two hours later, the meeting with Henley, the last person Steve wanted on his design team, ends with no agreement on the basic plan. Steve rides the elevator down to the building entrywayfor a quick cigarette, then returns to his desk to find e-mail from his supervisor moving the project deadline one day closer and asking Steve to work out a new timeline with Henley. The word “stress” comes into Steve's mind, and, just to put off facing Henley yet again, Steve clicks his computer browser to the insurance company Web site. The “What's New?” box offers a self-test entitled “Do You Have Stress or Does Stress Have You?” Steve enters his responses, gets a high score, and is presented with a choice of recommended online courses in stress management. Steve doesn't believe that he needs a shrink, but he decides that a computerized course can't hurt. He enrolls.

Over the next few weeks, with friendly e-mail reminders to accomplish his stated goals, Steve is pleasantly surprised at how much better he feels and at how many strategies he has integrated into his lifestyle. A few months after he completes the course, Steve experiences a difficult situation at work and notices that he is losing sleep, is irritable, and feels isolated. Steve remembers that help from trained psychotherapists in stress management and relationship skills was offered through the health insurance company's Web site, and he quickly locates a therapist in his geographic community. Steve is given the option of calling the therapist by telephone or completing a therapy request form via e-mail that is automatically forwarded as a secure encrypted transmission to the therapist he has chosen. He chooses to send an e-mail.

Between sessions, Dr. Simpson reviews her e-mail and finds Steve's request, from Steve's description of his problem, Dr. Simpson decides that this is not an emergency and that there are no duty-to-warn overtones, so by e-mail she offers Steve several appointment times. Dr. Simpson also directs Steve to a Web site on which he can complete routine office paperwork (verification of benefits, initial treatment authorization, assessment forms, and release to view his medical record). Over a secure transmission channel within his company's virtual private network, Steve can fill out a brief medical history form, including contact information for his other health care practitioners. After issuing a suitable disclaimer, Dr. Simpson recommends an online article related to his work situation for Steve to review. If Steve had indicated a more serious situation, with the risk of harm to himself or other people, she would have responded to him by telephone as a first contact to gain a more thorough understanding of his immediate needs.

-381-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Mental Health Professional and the New Technologies: A Handbook for Practice Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 539

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.