Seeking Equity for Women in Journalism and Mass Communication Education: A 30-Year Update

By Ramona R. Rush; Carol E. Oukrop et al. | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

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Beale, A., & Van Den Bosch, A. (Eds. ). (1998). Ghosts in the machine: Women and cultural policy in Canada and australia. Toronto, Canada: Garamond Press.

Bennett, L. (2002, Summer). Feminists must speak out against loss of media diversity. National NOW Times, 34(2), 13.

Bunting, M. (2001, Sept. 20). Special report: terrorism in the U. S. The Guardian (online, www.guardian.co.uk/analysis/story/0,3604,554794,00.html), n.p. Article retrieved September 25, 2001.

Byerly, C. M. (2001a, Winter). The deeper structures of storytelling: Women, media corporations and the task of communication researchers. Intersections, 1(2), 63–68.

Byerly, C. M. (2001b, August). Merger mania and the sexual politics of journalism education. Paper presented at Donna Allen Memorial Symposium, Freedom Forum, Roslyn, VA.

Byerly, CM. (2002). Gender and the political economy of newsmaking: A case study of human rights coverage. In E. R. Meehan & E. Riordan (Eds. ), Sex and money: feminism and political economy in the media, (pp. 130–144). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Compaine, B. M. & Gomery, D. (2000). Who owns the media? Competition and concentration in the mass media industry. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Corporatization of Higher Education, (pamphlet). (2000). Washington DC: American Association of University Professors (AAUP).

Edley, P., Shirvani, S., Carter, C., Byerly, C., Ross, K., & Newsom, V. (2002, July). In search of gender equity in the academy: A preliminary report of the media associations project. Paper presented at International Communication Association, Seoul, Korea.

Ford Foundation Report. (2000, Winter). Now it's a global movement: A special issue on women, 31(1).

Gallagher, M. (1995). An unfinished story: Gender patterns in media employment (Reports and Papers on Mass Communication 110). Paris: UNESCO Publishing.

Global Media News. (2000, Winter). Pullman, Washington: Center for Global Media Studies, 2(1).

Herman, E. S., & McChesney, R. W. (1997). The global media: the new missionaries of global capitalism. London, England and Washington, DC: Cassell.

A decade in courage: courage in journalism awards, 1990–1999 (report). 1999, October. Washington, DC: International Women's Media Foundation.

Kolodny, A. (1997). Failing the future: A dean looks at higher education in the twenty-first century. Durham, NC, USA and London, England: Duke University Press.

Koss-Feder, L. (2002, April 16). Study finds wage gap is just the beginning. Women's Enews: www.womensnews.org, n.p. Retrieved from website on April 17,2001.

Lauer, N. C. (2002, May 5). Studies show women's role in media shrinking. Women's Enews: www.womensenews.org, n.p. Retrieved from website on May 5,2002.

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