Seeking Equity for Women in Journalism and Mass Communication Education: A 30-Year Update

By Ramona R. Rush; Carol E. Oukrop et al. | Go to book overview

Author Biographies

JO-ANN HUFF ALBERS is former director, School of Journalism and Broadcasting at Western Kentucky University. Her teaching areas include press law and ethics, reporting, editing, editorial and feature writing, and current issues in mass communication. She was the 2000 Gerald Sass Journalism Administrator of the Year designated by the Freedom Forum/ASJMC, and holds numerous other awards in the field. She was the second woman to be president of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication (Mary Kahl Sparks of Texas Woman's University was the first). Albers spent 20 years at The Cincinnati Enquirer, ending as the Kentucky executive editor. She was editor and publisher of two daily newspapers before joining Western, the Sturgis Journal in Michigan and the Public Opinion in Pennsylvania. She has a Master of Education in Communication Arts from Xavier University, 1962, and the Bachelor of Arts, Broadcasting, Miami University, 1959. She has published hundreds of articles for newspapers, magazines and professional organization newsletters.

MARTHA LESLIE ALLEN is the Director of the Women's Institute for Freedom of the Press (WIFP), an organization founded by Donna Allen in 1972. In 1974 she began working with WIFP. She obtained her MA from Howard University in 1978, writing her thesis on “Black Women Journalists and the Black Press in the South at the Turn of the Century. ” In 1988 she received her PhD in history, also from Howard University. Her doctoral dissertation is on the history of

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